Lawn drip system

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by ByDesignCO, Apr 2, 2013.

  1. RhettMan

    RhettMan LawnSite Silver Member
    from Texas
    Posts: 2,121

    I ha' hurd sumthin baat roots?
     
  2. AI Inc

    AI Inc LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 25,236

    I picked up one of those fields as a service account last fall. Have to see what it looks like this yr. It was a contaminated site turned soccer field and the EPA would only allow a drip system
     
  3. AI Inc

    AI Inc LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 25,236

    His goal may be to use it even with a restriction as no one sees it running.
     
  4. cppendergrast

    cppendergrast LawnSite Member
    Posts: 107

    I'd be skeptical of that with the clay content in the soils around here.....
     
  5. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    It is, no question about it.

    It is, no question about it, but if that is what he wants why do you care?
     
  6. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    You heard wrong. Bury the line deep enough to allow for conventional aeration.

    Why?
     
  7. DanaMac

    DanaMac LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,156

    We are on 2 day a week watering, but drip and subsurface drip are exempt and can water all they want. But - they still pay the higher rates and fees if they water too much. Higher rates,and lower volume ceilings on the tiers.

    Yes, install drip lower than the aerator tines, and it will be fine. Don't lay it on the ground with sod right on top.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  8. Autoflow

    Autoflow LawnSite Member
    Posts: 245

    From my experience with sub-surface drip, it is useless on clay soil where the turf is used frequently be it sport or foot traffic/kids playing. Short term it was very good, but after 4-5 years I found it to be ineffective once the soil was compacted. Lawns just had green circles above where the emitters were, but the water would not spread, regardless of run times.

    If you do it 4-5" deep in clay soil, the soil compacts around it and it won't spread. If you install it 3" deep it seemed to worked better, but then you can't aerate anyway. In loam soils it is great, but I think it is best to install drip on a slightly clay/loam base to retain the moisture but prevent compaction with a 4-5" deep sandy-loam layer on top which again will not allow the soil to become compacted when used for recreational purposes.

    On lawns where they are purely for looking at, the jobs I installed 7-8 years ago are still working perfect despite being on loamy-clay soils. You also have to be careful if home owners are likely to pierce the dripline with things like pegs to hold down play equipment and things like that. Yesterday I had to repair two holes in sub-surface drip under lawn where this had happened when play equipment is moved. You then have to flush the system carefully to ensure all the dirt is out of the system. I just unscrewed the flush valve and let it run for a while until I thought the system was free of garbage.

    I should add, drip is very efficient, especially in narrow strips and windy areas, and also does not add to fungus problems like overhead watering does. On the other hand you have to manually wash in fertilisers because the drip does not do it.
     
  9. cppendergrast

    cppendergrast LawnSite Member
    Posts: 107

    My experience also.
     
  10. ByDesignCO

    ByDesignCO LawnSite Member
    Posts: 11

    The soil is very high in clay content. The current restrictions are 2 days a week, but since this client is on ditch water, I bet they get to use 3 days a week. It's not that I really care, ill put the system in if he wants. I just dont think it is the correct application for him considering he hasnt even used the system yet.

    He has changed his mind from wanting KBG to synthetic turf, to a native mix. We are on the native mix now and I think a spray with an exemption to establish, then back on a 2 or 3 day/week schedule will be more than sufficient.
     

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