Lawn Estimation School Project

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by thenipper, Nov 26, 2002.

  1. thenipper

    thenipper LawnSite Member
    from Iowa
    Posts: 2

    I teach a Turf Management Class. My students would be interested in some real life examples of lawn estimation reports. What do you use and could I see some examples to show them?

    Also, I am a big believer in contracts. How necessary are they with residential and commercial customers?
     
  2. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    Yoooouuur students, huuuh? Yeeaah right...:rolleyes: Seriously though, try the search feature, and ise the words estimate and formula(s). You'll come up with alot of good info. Some guys have some really neat ideas for formulas they use.
     
  3. GarPA

    GarPA LawnSite Silver Member
    from PA
    Posts: 2,585

    hmmm..lets see...you "teach" a turf mgt class....and you are a "big believer" in contracts......A "teacher" is presumed to have credentials/be an "expert" etc....one would therefore assume you would have this most basic info in your hip pocket

    pahleeze....give it up...if you want help with your biz, just ask for it
     
  4. Ryan Lightning

    Ryan Lightning LawnSite Senior Member
    from CA
    Posts: 554

    Welcome to lawnsite! Just ignore the rude people.:rolleyes:
    The search is a great tool.
     
  5. thenipper

    thenipper LawnSite Member
    from Iowa
    Posts: 2

    I hope this is legal. This is the school website I work for: www.oelwein.k12.ia.us. I teach Agricultural Science at the High School.

    The reason for this request is because I don't like to teach the book. For instance, they say to get out your T square and draw the lawn you are estimating. I haven't seen an architectural drawing yet in an estimate. That much drawing seems like a waste of time to me.

    The book examples are very general. I have given them an example of what to put in their proposal, but I need some expert's example that proves what I have been saying is correct. I am just looking for some ammo to use to add to my credibility. You can never have too many weapons.

    No offense by any comments taken.
     
  6. MacLawnCo

    MacLawnCo LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,847

    make up your ammo. will they know the difference?- NO
     
  7. Art Stubbs handy 58

    Art Stubbs handy 58 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 132

    Hey thenipper,

    Where are you located??? I'm from Waterloo...
    if need help pm me and ill see what i can do for you......:D
     
  8. Love Thy Neighbor

    Love Thy Neighbor LawnSite Member
    Posts: 33

    Why would he make up his ammo if he's trying to Educate kids.
    That's why some of us are so messed up today. People lie to us growing up and we have stupid outlooks on life.

    Class of 2005 hope you don't work with children.
     
  9. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    Well, I hope you've found something useful by now using the search feature. If there are any questions you may have regarding ANYTHING in this industry, please feel free to PM me, (using the private message feature on this site) and I'm sure I can give you some good examples and applications to this. Speaking of applications, you may want to apply a bit of the fertilizer estimating in with your lesson plan. It's pretty interesting the way it's done, and you can also go into application RATES which, afterall, is the most important aspect of all in this division. Many people just don't realize or know that when a particular soil condition calls for say, 1# of actual Nitrogen per M (M = 1000 sq. ft) for instance, how to read the actual percentage on the bag, per how much is in the bag, and apply the correct amount of fertilizer per M. Just an idea, and it's really not as complicated as it sounds. However, there are many more applications where measurement and square footage are necessary. A chart of cubic feet is helpful too, like if you needed to apply topsoil, for instance, to raise a low area. If you have 1000 sq. ft. that has to come up 2 inches, then x yards will be needed, and so on, and so on.;)
     

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