Lawn Install over pressurized mound system

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by procut, May 30, 2008.

  1. procut

    procut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,853

    I am going to be seeding a lawn that has a pressurized mound septic system. I know that there is a clean-out somewhere on top of the mound that you want to stay away from with the power rake / tractor. However, my question is will it cause any probems to drive over it with a 30hp tractor and till down about 3" top with a power rake and or landscape rake? Thanks!
     
  2. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,749

    You should contact the engineer who designed the system. These things vary widely in design especially from state to state.
     
  3. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

    I agree, Even though you might be Ok, you would still want to know for sure. Just like checking out utilities at a job site.

    Worst case scenario, locate the cap, and then just use a hand, or walk behind tiller in that spot, Much less weight, and don't go so deep. There is probably always going to be growing issues on top of a septic system.
     
  4. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,749

    The other alternative is to do .... dare I say ..... hand work over that particular area and then you neither have to kill yourself trying to get answers or waste time trying to get them. The system can't be that big, assuming it is residential. Even if you only have a general idea of where it is, you should be able to handle 1,000 square feet fairly easily I would think.
     
  5. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

    Good call, easier not to tear things up rather than fixing them.
     
  6. procut

    procut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,853


    Thats pretty much the conclusion I came to after doing some other research. It is residential, and its not a super big area. Better safe than sorry. I do have a walk behind tiller, so the weight won't be an issue, and I'll just scratch up the surface. Thanks for the replies.
     
  7. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,749

    A walk behind tiller is not a hand tool. There is a great deal of expense if you breal that thing. You can't fix it yourself. You need the board of health involved, the engineer, and a licensed septic intaller. A stupid 2" pvc pipe getting whacked can turn into a couple of grand very quickly. Its not worth it.

    I can't believe how dependent people are getting on power equipment. How hard is it to seed a thousand square feet of lawn without a motor?
     
  8. procut

    procut LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,853

    Whats so bad about using a tiller, if you have it you might as well use it?:hammerhead:
     
  9. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776


    I agree, I'm more of a naturalist, so I stay away from the power equipment if I can. But, powered tillers work good in some situations, and besides, I still want my health in 20 years, so if I can use a piece of power equipment, I will.
     
  10. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,749

    Nothing is wrong with a tiller until you shatter a pvc pipe in a $20k pressure dosed septic system and have to go through a very expensive process to repair it.

    I'm not a earthy crunchy guy trying to stop you from using power equipment. I'm just amazed that so many guys can not wipe their butts without plugging something into an outlet (pun intended) or yanking on a pull cord. Sometimes it makes sense to spend an extra couple of hours with a rake and shovel in a very limited area than to risk damaging something that would be very costly to fix.
     

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