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Lawn Polymers ?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Ground Master, Mar 13, 2003.

  1. Ground Master

    Ground Master LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 505

    I've received 2 flyers recently from different lawn companies on my own door advertising lawn polymers. I've used polymers in new landscapes whereby they are rototilled into the soil. These guys are advertising spreading them on top of lawns? Or thats the interpretation I got from these flyers.

    Well, I decided to call and find out what exactly they are talking about. This is what I was told:

    Step 1- Aerate lawn
    Step 2-Use a fertilizer speader to spead polymers
    Step 3-Rake and blow polymers into the holes made by the aerator

    I'm not kidding........how in the heck is this gonna work? I can see some polymers getting into the holes, but most will sit on the grass. Seems like the polymers that sit on the grass won't do much.....just absorb water on top of the grass.

    Does anyone do this or have experience with this?
  2. jeffex

    jeffex LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,933

    2-3 yrs ago I first saw a show on home and garden tv about this. They had a aerator like machine that forced the polymers into the soil . At that time I was very interested and e-mailed HGTV for more info. I got no response at all. I found a supplier for the polymers in a company called Soil Moist. They had not heard of the machine that would inject the polymers into the soil. I'm glad you reminded me of this because I will search again to see if this machine is available.
    I agree that the effectiveness of putting the polymers into the soil is low using a spreader. I would love to offer the service in my area due to recent drought trends. The info from the show said the average 1/4 acre lawn would cost the homeowner $300-$400 to treat. The polymers were supposed to be effective for 2-3 yrs .
  3. paponte

    paponte LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,366

    Something that could maybe fit into an overseeder? I never saw the actual product. :confused:
  4. jeffex

    jeffex LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,933

    We make the polymers.
    There use to be many of these machines, but all seem to be out of business.


    jrm chemical

    This is an e-mail I got from one of the polymer distributers about the injection machines
  5. Mike Bradbury

    Mike Bradbury LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 493

    a university study some years back, to the effect that they didn't live long in the real world in soil conditions.
  6. I had the same idea. Saw an article saying it wouldn't be very helpful. Even the mfg of the polymers said it wouldn't be that effective. Top dress with organic mulch still the best solution.
    When I get back this pm I'll see if I can find some of the info I had looked up about this.

    Here is one link
    scroll to the bottom of that link and look at 1611 also
  7. Ground Master

    Ground Master LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 505

    thanks, Bob.....didn't think about looking up the csu website.
  8. Murano

    Murano LawnSite Member
    Posts: 3

    I actually own a machine called a Polymizer. The polymers get partially hydrated and are injected in a liquid form. The polymizer is a diesel powered rubber tracked machine with a spiked roller on the front. When the spikes go into the turf they inject the polymers right into the root zone.
    The manufacture is in Idaho. The product that gets injected is called "Enviromoist". Works very well. However in my area there is too much rainfall and it's really not needed.

    My machine is actually for sale if anyone is interested. (hint-hint).

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