lawn/soil ph test

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by Ramairfreak98ss, Apr 21, 2006.

  1. Ramairfreak98ss

    Ramairfreak98ss LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,210

    How are one of these performed? ive done this to pools/liquid before but not soil. thanks
     
  2. upidstay

    upidstay LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,363

    Best tool is a soil probe, but a small shove or garden trowel works too. Take about 1 1/2 cups of soil from random sections of your lawn. Remove any plant material, stones, etc. The lab will need about 1 cup, maybe a lttle more. Your local ag. extension station can do the test, or there are private labs, and many universities w/turf programs do them also. Lesco will do it for $20 or so.
     
  3. jt5019

    jt5019 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,432

    I mailed out a sample to Uconn it says online it takes about 5 to 7 days to get the results. They accept samples from out of state too i believe it is 7 dollars for the basic tests for out of state samples.
     
  4. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    If you are just checking Ph. with a soil probe, you will be wasting your time and money.

    Ph is much more than a test to see if you need lime. Your soil can have a very high Ph and not contain enough calcium to provide the needs of the plant. Calcium, Magnesium, Sodium, and Potassium are the major Cation's that determine the soil Ph. Of those four elements, Calcium (such as is found in lime), has the least effect of the soils Ph. A ph test will not tell you if you need lime. If the ph levels are high because of magnesium, sodium, or potassium, Calcium as well as other nutrients will probably be necessary to help lower the Ph levels. You can also have a low ph and have plenty of calcium. In those instances, magnesium, sodium or potassium will be needed to raise the ph levels.

    A complete soil test that checks for calcium, magnesium, sodium, and sulfur, as well as nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium is the best way to approach balancing the soils ph levels.
     
  5. upidstay

    upidstay LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,363

    When I said "soil probe" I meant the kind you se to take a soil sample, not a pH meter soil probe.
     
  6. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Glemplers has , or did have, a good test probe for sale. Thats where I got mine. Seems like it was around $50+/-. Stainless steel with a cutout for removing the sample. A good clean sharpshooter shovel will do the same thing, it just means a little more work.
     
  7. jbone

    jbone LawnSite Member
    Posts: 125

    when you say "local ag. extension" what do you mean? How do I find mine? Do you need to send it in any specific type of container?
     
  8. upidstay

    upidstay LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,363

    Local Agricultual Extension Station. Not sure what they call them in NY, but that's what it is here in CT. It is either part of your dept of environmental protection, or your dept of agriculture. Check out those websites and see what they list. I would mail mine in double zip lock bags placed in a box w/ shipping pop corn or newspaper.
     

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