Learning curve > stand-on spray units

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by americanlawn, Apr 24, 2014.

  1. americanlawn

    americanlawn LawnSite Fanatic
    from midwest
    Posts: 5,852

    Wondering how long it takes for a guy to be proficient at operating a stand-on spreader/sprayer???

    Reason I ask is I was amazed yesterday. This spring, we stole an employee from a local competitor. He had 2 weeks training on a Z-Spray intermediate last fall, but said he wasn't very good at it.

    So yesterday, I let him drive a T3000 around the shop. Then I showed him a 20 acre cemetery that needed 'round one'. So I dropped him off at the cemetery with one ton of fert. I told him to return to the shop for more fert when he ran out. (4 lbs per K)

    I got my route done about 2:00 p.m. So I drove back to the cemetery to see how Steve was doing. Turned out he just filled and was on his last section to complete the entire property.

    So then I inspected his tire tracks, granular coverage, etc. It was perfect. Not bad for his first day.

    Pretty much the only stand-on spreader/sprayers we see around here are the T3000,s, but what baffles me is so many lawnsite members saying they use something else. I don 't get it. :confused:

    Steve's main comment was, "It's was so easy".

    I'm 60-years-old, and I'm beginning to realize why TURFCO has patented their machine.

    thoughts?
     
  2. kbrashears

    kbrashears LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 761

    I trained my guy to use a Z in about 160hours. Sprayed water around my house a few times. Turned him loose on baseball fields first, then some family lawns. He's got the hang of it now. He's good. Proficient? Still a ways to go. But he's doing great because he doesn't want to go back to dragging hose.

    It is probably easier to learn on a T. But I want more productivity out of my tech. We have many large properties and during spray rounds, he is going to be wasting too much time refilling.

    I know you don't want to hear it, but I guarantee you a Z can do more production than a T. No problem at all. In fact, I wish there was a spray rig rodeo. I'd take on all comers.
     
  3. CHARLES CUE

    CHARLES CUE LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,091

    I agree with you larry a great machine it was put together with lots of though. Easy to use I can even use it.

    But to each there own
     
  4. kbrashears

    kbrashears LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 761

    That should read 10-16 hours. Not 160 hours. Lol.
     
  5. Raymond S.

    Raymond S. LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 981

    I learned in a few hours. Can't imagine it taking longer than that. If you can drive a zero turn mower you can drive a Z spray. Biggest hurdle is learning when and where to start and stop the fert. I've never driven a T3000 but I would like to just to know the difference.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  6. kbrashears

    kbrashears LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 761

    The main differences I can see is turning radius and ability to change directions and head back the other way much quicker on a Z. T is better on slopes for a novice.

    Larry will tell you that you can't drive a Z one handed. That's not true. That's the only way I drive my Z.
     
  7. Raymond S.

    Raymond S. LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 981

    I rarely drive mine with 2 hands. Right hand usually holds a wand for spot spraying weeds outside my booms and for pulling fert on and off.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  8. DA Quality Lawn & YS

    DA Quality Lawn & YS LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,870

    For a PG/GL type, you can get onto it within an hour or so. To be proficient, probably a couple long days in the field. Easiest machines to use by far.
     
  9. Service 1st Lawn Care

    Service 1st Lawn Care LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 643

    As usual Larry doesn't really care just pushing T-3000, blah,blah,blah.:rolleyes:
     
  10. kbrashears

    kbrashears LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 761

    Be nice. He's dang near 60 and he just realized that companies patent their ideas.
     

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