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Learning Design

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Craig Turf Management, Jan 26, 2001.

  1. Craig Turf Management

    Craig Turf Management LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 354

    I am primarily in the lawn maintenance business, but I have requests from time to time to design beds etc. What I want to know is what you scapers would recommend for someone wanting to learn design. I would like to do my designs by hand at first, and maybe buy some software later. Are their any good books on design? Also I need help on design ideas. Plant selection, placement, etc. Will someone please help me to get started.
    Thanks, Bill
  2. Stonehenge

    Stonehenge LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,277

    That's a really big subject to learn about....hmmmm. I don't know that I can recommend a single reference to learn all those things you want to learn. My suggestion is to do this: Call American Nurserymen @ 1-800-621-5727 and have them send you one of their book/video catalogs. They've got hundreds of references to choose from. I believe that they have a website, too. http://www.amerinursery.com I've probably bought $1-2K in books and software from these folks.
  3. Lanelle

    Lanelle LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,361

    There are many books that you could utilize as Stonehenge said. To begin to sharpen your design sensibilities, get Horticulture and Garden Design magazines. Get catalogs from local growers and suppliers so that you know what is available and workable for your area. No point in learning all about a group of plants that won't do well in your region. Who knows, maybe I'll find the time to put together the beginnings of a book list. Also, go to public display gardens and arboritums to become more familiar with the overall characteristics of particular trees and shrubs.
    Another approach would be to have a free-lance landscape designer do the design/sales for you and you do the install. This would allow you to learn while earning. Of course you would have to pay the designer a commission fee, but it could be a workable situation for a while.

    [Edited by Lanelle on 01-26-2001 at 05:19 PM]
  4. cutting edge

    cutting edge LawnSite Member
    Posts: 194

    Look for classes at your local tech school or college. That is what I am planning to do to increase my design/installation knowledge.

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