Lesco Quality Blue Blend KBG Seeds

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by mlong30, Sep 25, 2007.

  1. mlong30

    mlong30 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 111

    Hi All,

    I'm here in Indianapolis, In, and I just thatched my yard yesterday evening before it starting raining. Its suppose to rain again tomorrow, so I'm planning on renting an aerator either wednesday evening or thursday evening while my lawn is moist.

    I purchased the following 50lbs bag of 100% KBG from Lesco today called "Quality Blue Blend KBG Seeds" for $152.00! I'm using Lesco for the first time this year so each step is new for me.

    Item: 001715
    %PURITY COMPONENT
    49.22 Lakeshore KBG
    24.80 Glenmont KBG
    24.76 Excursion KBG

    1. Does anyone knows what this seeds will look like? I just wanted KBG only, but I didn't think to ask what it would look like. I just assumed its lesco so it must be good.

    2. After I aerate, would it be best to use Lesco starter fertilizer (18-24-12) or have a load of compost delivered to my house, and spread over the seeds? My front yard is suppose to be sod, but after thatching it looks like dirt. My back yard is clay.

    3. Which direction should I aerate? North, South, and Diagonal or just North and South?


    I currently have no weeds for the first time in 10years! I want to keep it that way from now on.

    Thanks.

    Matt
     
  2. carcrz

    carcrz LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,085

    You can do compost, but I'd put it down before the seed & stir the seed in after.
    Fertilize once the seed has germinated & is a couple inches.
    Aeration direction doesn't matter since holes are holes.
    Verticut / dethatch in a diamond pattern.
     
  3. Drew Gemma

    Drew Gemma LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,510

    core aerrate spreed seed at desired rate throw wheel track to wheel track so you don't streak your lawn starter fert and water are your friends.
     
  4. mlong30

    mlong30 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 111

    What ingredients should be in the compost? I really don't want to try to spread it out by hand, so is there a machine I can rent, that will do this for me?

    Thanks.

    Matt
     
  5. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Well, To answer your questions:

    1) You just 'thatched' your yard, so you're used to the trudgery and angst that is associated with being the owner of a bluegrass yard in the Transition Zone. You may very well also have a long history of grubworm, sod webworm, and various fungus problems that have required treatments if you've been a bluegrass person. I pray to my higher power that you have a good irrigation system, keep your blades real sharp, and you know how to raise and lower your blades according to the heat and cool weather. So I'm guessing you're glutten for punishment AGAIN, and WANT the fine texture of bluegrass vs. the thicker texture yet MUCH more durable and suitable-for-our-climate turf type tall fescues? :dancing: OK, fine. You've probably put it down by now anyway! It rained. :cry: KBG of course is very thin bladed, and bluegrass is rhizomous, which means that it's roots surface and make new plants readily, but also makes 'thatch' readily too. Having 3 types in a blend like this should be fine.

    I'd like to see a picture or two of your existing yard, though. I wonder how much of it really IS bluegrass? Maybe you could post one?

    2)Trying to 'mix' compost into clay soil with an aerater is like trying to stir water into oil. There is a HUGE difference in density. Unless you REALLY renovate the given area with a serious piece of equipment (like a rockhound or a GOOD slice seeder) you'll have the compost 'slide' away in the rain :cry: , and likely the seed with it.
    3)Which direction to aerate? EVERY direction!!!:) (no kidding) You CANNOT 'over-aerate' your yard, unless, of course,you over-exert yourself!
    Watch out for the sprinkler heads and invisable fences!
     
  6. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    OH, yeah. One more word on your soil. Just because you have 'clayish' soil, don't assume that you necessarily have 'poor' soil. Ideal soil is made up of 1/3 clay, 1/3 silt and 1/3 sand, but even THAT could be deficient in growing plants IF key nutrients are missing in the soil. Actually, many clay soils are very rich in nutrients (like here too in Cincy), but the nutrients are 'locked up' because the clay particles are 'packed' together so tightly. In my opinion, don't sweat using any compost. Concentrate on making a good seeding 'base' with what you've got. And don't waste any more time! In reality, most seed contractors have wrapped up their work because if the seed doesn't come up and is 'mowable' before the ground cools and the turf goes dormant, your work could be at risk.
     
  7. mlong30

    mlong30 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 111

  8. Fenway

    Fenway LawnSite Member
    from Indiana
    Posts: 23

    I see that kind of problem all over the place here in my neighborhood on the North Side of Indy. I went with 50lbs of Lesco Tri-Gold Turf Type Tall Fescue and I don't think it was over $100. That seed you are using must be more expensive. Good Luck
     
  9. mlong30

    mlong30 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 111

    This is the first time I spent this kind of money on seeds.

    http://www.lesco.com/?PageCode=PROD_DETAIL&ItemNumber=001715

    But lesco locally sold it to me cheaper, than what I see online. I killed most of my Tall Fescue with Corsair from lesco, because it just didn't look good to me. My back yard had huge circles of tall fescue, then KBG. It just looked like weeds to me, with a different shade of color. But I had different seeds from different stores that I purchased over the years from Lowes, and Home depot.

    Do you know of a place locally that sells good compost with no weeds?

    Thanks.

    Matt
     
  10. mlong30

    mlong30 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 111

    I ran a Ph test on my soil over the weekend, and it came back as 5.5:mad:

    After talking with my Lesco rep on Saturday, he suggested not to put down that much lime at one time, so he suggested that I put down 150lbs of lime this fall, then twice next year and continue, until my PH is normal. He sold it to me for $6.89 a bag.

    http://www.lesco.com/?PageCode=PROD_DETAIL&ItemNumber=008979

    Matt
     

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