Lets talk Dirty

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Updog, Aug 29, 2005.

  1. Updog

    Updog LawnSite Member
    Posts: 80

    Well not really dirty just dirt. I need help figuring how much dirt to I will need to build a berm 60' long 10' wide 2' tall at the center. I don't usually ask for help but I have no Idea how to figure this one. I was thinking it would be around 15 yards but I can't just guess at it I have no where to put any extra dirt. Any help will be greatly appreciated thanks.
     
  2. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,749

    A rough estimate would be that the berm has an average depth of one foot. 60 x 10x 1 = 600 CF = a little more than 22 CuYds. You should be safe figuring 25.
     
  3. Updog

    Updog LawnSite Member
    Posts: 80

    Thanks I had started to think 15 wouldn't be enough. I there anyone that can give me a formula to use in the future. I know how to figure flat surfaces slopes throw me.
     
  4. vadeere

    vadeere LawnSite Member
    Posts: 247

    If you assume the berm to half of a cylinder on its side it would be easy, i think. Heres is what i got :

    .5(3.14)(radius in feet)(lenght in feet)= cubic footage

    take this number and divide by 27 to give cubic yardage

    *Remember dirt compacts more on site than it does when its on the truck some say by as much as 25 percent, im thinking closer to 15 percent. So to figure this in multiply your cubic yardage by 1.15 to yield total material in cubic yards needed when compaction is figured. (This example is assuming you will use the 15 percent rule) Hope I helped and if anyone finds a mistake in my math by all means tell this man the correct formula. :waving:
     
  5. start2finish

    start2finish LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 497

    or you could use a triangle for the bearm, 1/2 b x h
    10x2, =20 divided by 2
    10x60= 600 / 27 = 22.2, I always round up to the nearest truck, so at 12 yards per truck I would I would figure 2 truck loads.

    Also is the bearm following contour. Will the bearm impound any water, you may need to fill in front of the bearm to run the water around it. SOunds complicated but not really. I would figure 25% more dirt than I needed, like vadeere said, dirt compacts 25%, well 15% as he said would probably be accurate although you are not compacting this soil except what you inadvertantly do while under construction.(skid steer, tractor "walking over while building" anyway somewhere between my figure and vadeeres should put you close to the mark.
     
  6. sheshovel

    sheshovel LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,112

    I must be loosin it!The calc I came with is
    60'x10'x2'=1200sq' divided by 27sq'in a cubic yard=44.44
    yards...What did I do wrong here?
     
  7. greywynd

    greywynd LawnSite Member
    Posts: 132

    Your calculations are for a square or rectangular cross section, the berm he is wanting to make is a triangle (actually 2 back to back, like the peak of a house.) Your numbers are fine if you divide by 2 to allow for the slopes. (Gives you half of the square, a triangle if you draw a line from corner to corner in the square.)
     
  8. all ferris

    all ferris LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,307

    You are figuring for a square berm. I think the berm he is tying to build will be 2' at its highest point and taper off on either side of that so it will look more like 1/2 a cylinder. Don't you guys remember when your math teacher told you to pay attention in class because you will need to know this stuff in the future? I actually took all the math courses I had to take to become a civil engineer. you could actually apply calculus to figure out how much dirt he needs but it is a little involved(but you'll also get a more accurate answer).
     
  9. olderthandirt

    olderthandirt LawnSite Platinum Member
    from here
    Posts: 4,900

    The way she came up with those # might not be the correct, but from experience I'd put money on the fact that 44 yds is a lot closer than 25 yds.
    The # I came up with is 34.88 yds. and thats without compaction.
     
  10. greywynd

    greywynd LawnSite Member
    Posts: 132

    Well, the numbers I'm getting are still in the 22-25 yard range. Older, can you explain to me how you come up with 35?

    I often can figure by experience, and that's telling me that 25 won't be enough, yet the numbers tell us that. Maybe you're factoring something that we haven't thought of?
     

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