Liability insurance for backflow testers

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by Mad Estonian, Jan 10, 2007.

  1. Mad Estonian

    Mad Estonian LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 280

    For all you backflow testers out there- who's insuring you (the company, i.e. Lloyd's, ING, etc., not your broker), and what are you paying? I've been working on getting insured for a couple of months now. My broker tells me that the companies are all ignorant and paranoid about backflow testing. I could get insured for $500-$750/yr. (Canadian) just for irrigation and landscaping, but add on the backflow and I'm looking at $3000 (this includes "errors and omissions," which is the important thing for testers). Unless I was a certified plumber, then it would just be $1000. Most plumbers around here can't be bothered to do backflows, but the purveyor is now mandating annually-tested DCVA's for all new irrigation systems, so there's a big market awaiting. And the insurance will be mandatory soon. Thanks. (Of course, there's probably somewhere online I could get a plumbing certificate for a hundred bucks or something, P.H.D. in Psychology while I'm at it...)
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,014

    That's sort of logical, being that a licensed plumber might be less likely to commit those errors and omissions.
     
  3. Mad Estonian

    Mad Estonian LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 280

    That's sort of logical, being that a licensed plumber might be less likely to commit those errors and omissions

    Thanks for your support. Which insurance firm do you represent? By the way, I just discovered that other online forum, the one that rhymes with "WinklerWalk." How do you find any time to work, when you're online 24/7?
     
  4. If it's going to be or is being regulated, you see an opportunity, take it. On the insurance thing though, as there becomes more of a demand, the pricing should become more competitive. At least that's my 2 cents.
     
  5. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Henry Winkler made that move famous... "The Fonz Frolic" :laugh:
     
  6. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Is this TIC Boots? :)
     
  7. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,014

    Huh? Like the guy said above, it's early days yet, and when coverage is just beginning to be written, the underwriters are going to be pulling numbers out of their wazoo, if they don't have a wealth of data to work from.
     
  8. bobw

    bobw LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 807

    and when they pull a number out of their wazoo, they will make sure that there wazoo is covered....
     
  9. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,014

    Insurance and backflow is an interesting topic, since it's likely one's standard liability insurance provides zero coverage in the event of a backflow occurrence. The insurance companies can call it 'pollution' and point out that it's not a risk their policy covers.
     
  10. Mad Estonian

    Mad Estonian LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 280

    Insurance and backflow is an interesting topic, since it's likely one's standard liability insurance provides zero coverage in the event of a backflow occurrence. The insurance companies can call it 'pollution' and point out that it's not a risk their policy covers.

    Yeah, that's where the "errors and omissions" comes in. If I test an assembly, it checks out fine, drive away, something blocks up a valve and causes backflow 5 minutes later, even proving my innocence will cost thousands, but errors and omissions would cover that (regular liability wouldn't). And my broker agrees that in a few years, once the companies figure out the real story, the cost of insurance will come way down. Doesn't do me much good now. It just seemed to me that down in the States, a lot of you guys (and gals) seem to live in areas where backflow testing has been standard for a while. Does anyone know of any insurers who have caught on that it's not such a big hairy deal? Though obviously, the companies my broker's trying to deal with are the same huge international firms you would be, so I guess they don't get it. But are those of you who are testing fully covered? And if so, do you know which company's providing it, and for how much? And for interest's sake, here's an article I found on backflow insurance a while back (hope I did this right...)http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=70852&stc=1&d=1168534818
     

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