lime & seed

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by stslawncare, Oct 11, 2002.

  1. stslawncare

    stslawncare LawnSite Bronze Member
    from DE
    Posts: 1,484

    hey guys getting ready to do some dethatching, aerating, overseeding. was wondering if its ok to spread lime at the same time?
     
  2. Green Pastures

    Green Pastures LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,457

    Yes

    Scott
     
  3. stslawncare

    stslawncare LawnSite Bronze Member
    from DE
    Posts: 1,484

    whats everyones thoughts on starter fert also? is starter fert needed when overseeding? any problems with starter fert and lime? how about regular fert? anything that shouldnt go together?
     
  4. Green Pastures

    Green Pastures LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,457

    starter fert:yes
    regular fert: yes, but why when there's starter fert. Unless you did a soil test and it calls for something specific.

    Scott
     
  5. lawnstudent

    lawnstudent LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 472

    Starter fert usually has more phosphorus to encourage root development. This is a good idea when seeding. But is it too late to seed in your area? Those seedlings need to harden off before the cold sets in if they are to survive the winter. You take a risk when you overseed late in fall.

    Generally late fall fert applications are not a good idea. Nitrogen forces vegatative growth. Will that new growth have a chance to harden off before the cold sets in? Dormant lawn fert apps are beneficial only when top growth has ceased but root development continues in late fall.


    jim
     
  6. GarPA

    GarPA LawnSite Silver Member
    from PA
    Posts: 2,585

    Jim...I always learn allot from your posts. But we are only 3 weeks into fall...do you consider the 2nd week in October to be late fall?
     
  7. KenH

    KenH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,622

    There is really no "set" time. You have to keep your eye on the temps. If you were to seed now, being its cooler, you would have to allow AT LEAST 10 days for germination. After that, another 2 weeks or so for a mowing to promote root/shoot development. That will bring you into November, and we are probably talking about a hard frost by then. Will the new seed be ready?? questionable at best.
     
  8. stslawncare

    stslawncare LawnSite Bronze Member
    from DE
    Posts: 1,484

    whats a good general temp range? for the next week the forcast says highs in the upper 60s and lows in the mid 40's
     
  9. KenH

    KenH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,622

    You want the young plants to be able to withstand the winter, meaning they need time to put a root system down before the frosts. It might be 60 now, but what about in 2 weeks when the grass is 1/2" tall. Who knows??
     
  10. Turfdude

    Turfdude LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,900

    Jim,

    I'm glad you admit you're a lawn student (aren't we all actually). Scottie and others in the mid-Atlantic area can do and continue to do seeding thru October and maybe early November if the weather continues as it has. If the lawns are aerated, the seed may not germinate now, but will definately do so in the spring. Also, we are encouraged to do an application in November (around Thanksgiving) of high N. The coop extension service agents preach to us that since the lawns are going dormant, that the N will go to root and stem development and help sustain the turf better through the winter months w/ a heathier greener look. They also claim that there will be less need for early spring N to green up turf. Too many apply high spring N, then wind up w/ too much topgrowth, a lot of thatch and of course, fungal problems.

    Bob

    P.S. Please do not take this as any kind of personal attack. We are all "students" here, trying to learn from one another.
     

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