Limits on the tow capabilites of dually 1 ton diesel trucks....

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by lyube, Jul 5, 2008.

  1. lyube

    lyube LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,597

    Curious. The manufacturers rate it for one amount while I see some who driver their trucks with more. Could any of the big three handle an 8 ton load without becoming a safety liability? (Assuming the trailer has brakes, gooseneck...)
     
  2. IA_James

    IA_James LawnSite Silver Member
    from Iowa
    Posts: 2,592

    The problem with an 8 ton load on a one ton is where the GCWR (Gross Combine Weight Rating) runs into GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating). Like you say, alot of the truck are rated for say 16k lbs of trailer. A properly loaded bumper pull will have about 10% on the ball. So, you need to find a hitch that will take 1600 lbs of tounge weight. They are effectively non existent. So, that leaves us gooseneck/5th wheel. A properly loaded goose/5th will have between 15-25% on the pin. That leaves us at 2400-4k lbs of pin weight. This is where we run into the GVWR. To be kosher with the manufacturer, the DOT, and your insurance company (get in a wreck and kill some folks and they may drop you like a bad habit if you are over...just sayin) you need to keep your GVWR/GCWR right. So you take a truck like mine for example. 9200 GVWR. Scales out at 7600 or so empty with me in it. We then buy us a 12k lbs trailer. My GCWR is 20k lbs. Truck is 7600, plus 12k of trailer =19600 lbs, just barely legal right? Not so fast my friend. A 12k goose or 5th gives us 1800 lbs of pin weight. 1800+7600=9400 lbs, which is over the GVWR. Is it still safe at this level? Definitely, my truck doesn't hardly notice the first 1800 lbs, never mind another 200 on top of that. But it's techinically over the rating for the truck. So, even though my truck is allegedly rated to tow 12700 lbs, even at almost 1k lbs under that I'm over loaded. This is on a 3/4 ton 4x4 QC long bed diesel Dodge. The numbers put into the calculation will be a little different, but the answer will be similar.

    The short answer is, you can probably get away with it, but be very careful. If the DOT gets ahold of you they'll make you regret it.
     
  3. nosparkplugs

    nosparkplugs LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,445

    Nicely said,
     
  4. hosejockey2002

    hosejockey2002 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,195

    "Hot-shotters" do this routinely, towing up to 20,000 lbs, and they do it legally. Generally the DOT is not concerned with your truck's factory tow ratings, as long as you don't violate bridge laws regarding axle weights and tire loading. You do need to have the truck licensed for the weight you are moving, and if you are over 26,000 lbs. combined you need the correct driver's license. You also need the proper medical card, and your truck is subject to stopping at weigh stations and being inspected by the authority having jurisdiction over commercial vehicles in your area.

    Having said all that, I really don't know why the hotshotters use pickups to move the loads that they do. The engines (diesel) are more than up to moving the load, but the rest of the truck takes such a beating they are falling apart in just 300,000 miles. I say "just" 300,000 miles because the larger class 7-8 trucks can run 800,000-1,000,000 miles with a lower overall cost per mile per pound moved.
     
  5. AWJ Services

    AWJ Services LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Ga
    Posts: 4,276

  6. IA_James

    IA_James LawnSite Silver Member
    from Iowa
    Posts: 2,592

  7. AWJ Services

    AWJ Services LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Ga
    Posts: 4,276

    Well never seen many dump trucks or any big truck winning any drag races.:)


    His question not mine.
    I just provided a solution.
    He never said how fast he wanted too tow the load.:dancing:

    8 tons is less than 24,000 pounds.:drinkup:
     
  8. Gravel Rat

    Gravel Rat LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,544

    The biggest thing is BRAKES you have limited braking power.

    Hotshotting work is a money loosing job you wear your truck out before its even paid for.

    If you want to tow heavier trailers get a F-450 or F-550 sized truck a 1 ton dually with 17 inch wheels can't support big enough brakes. A F-450 550 sized truck runs 19.5 rubber far better load carrying capacity.
     
  9. Ridin' Around

    Ridin' Around LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 266

    I guess this makes me a "Hot Shot" when we pull the RC-100 with the Fecon Head on it. It tips the scales just under 13k. Our dually is plated up to 16k and the trailer is plated to 32k. It has plenty of braking power, and feels 110% better than the 2500 bumper pull setup I used to use for this! No excuse for it, I know. But it happens every day. When I have been stopped they seem way more concerned about the plates I have and that I have paid all of the fees involved rather than the factory ratings on the trucks. Just my .02!
     
  10. lyube

    lyube LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,597

    I ask because I am looking into getting a project vehicle, one weighing a hair under 8 tons and the other tipping the scales at 4 tons. If I can scrape by for now with a 3/4 ton (Dodge 2500 or F250 diesel) and to tow the 4 ton vehicle around and maybe get a bigger truck to use only occasionally that would be great.
     

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