Line Voltage Tree Lighting

Discussion in 'Landscape Lighting' started by elegance_alex, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. elegance_alex

    elegance_alex LawnSite Member
    Posts: 55

    What do you guys think of this? BTW It's not my install, but I'd like to hear opinions. WOuld you do like this or differently?

    IMG_2981.jpg

    IMG_2980_2.jpg
     
  2. JoeyD

    JoeyD LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,933

    I think it could be done better.....but definitley not as bad as this!

    [​IMG]
     
  3. elegance_alex

    elegance_alex LawnSite Member
    Posts: 55

    LOL That is a goof!
    Get points for creativity?
     
  4. TXNSLighting

    TXNSLighting LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 6,462

    Now thats a quality company right there...Wheres this at?
     
  5. Classic Lighting

    Classic Lighting LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 491

    Looks very unnatural does not blend. First thing that came to mind was snakes going up the tree
     
  6. seolatlanta

    seolatlanta LawnSite Member
    Posts: 176

    I do this type of moonlighting quite a bit and I have to say it doesnt look too bad . I dont know why he used such heavy guage SJ cord going up the trees. It would have been possible for him to run the power up the tree to the ballsts(s). At least he used watertights etc. It looks like he put the cords fastened to the tree way too tight.

    I obviously dont know where this is , but it could be he was doing it according to code and / or regulations. It looks like it might be at a building or campus that might have wanted it that way.

    Texas is the real home of mercury vapor lighting. I think the guys name is John Watson , and he invented the whole setup . If anybody else has any info feel free to chime in.
     
  7. elegance_alex

    elegance_alex LawnSite Member
    Posts: 55

    This is a recent installation at a museum courtyard in Ft Worth.
    We bid the job in low voltage LED but didn't win.

    NEC code discusses direct burial cable emerging from grade - requiring coverage up 8 feet. 2008 NEC 300.5 (D)1-4

    The conduit coverage material is called "Seal-tite" - Liquidtight flexible non-metallic conduit (LFMC) and is described in NEC Article 350.
    I don't know why this was done all the way to the fixtures, though, unless their boxes require a fitting at the installation location.
     
  8. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    Looks to me that they were using 120V PAR20 MH lamps, fixtures and ballasts in that tree. Would explain the use of that horrid liquid-tite sheathing and the large boxes etc.
     
  9. irrig8r

    irrig8r LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,535

    Why the enormous junction boxes at the fixtures...?

    That's the part that stands out the most to me.

    Hard to camouflage that conduit, but it could have been painted some... I hope it's the view of the tree that is the least noticed...
     
  10. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    Those are where the electronic ballasts are for the Metal Halide lamps.
     

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