Liner against a huge boulder?

Discussion in 'Water Features' started by JDUtah, May 13, 2011.

  1. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    2. Use 2 or 3 layers of liner underlayment (non-woven geotextile) depending on sharpness of edges on bottom of boulder.

    3. Don't see how my cost for a crane will help you. A decent size back-hoe might be able to handle it.

    1. Setting it more upright keeping the same horizontal orientation, like pic below. I would try to get the flat area on top of the boulder level and slightly canted toward the street.

    boulder LS edt.jpg
     
  2. STL Ponds and Waterfalls

    STL Ponds and Waterfalls LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,177

    Like Tadpole said double triple layers of underlayment. With sharp rocks use underlayment under your liner and on top of you liner. You can use anything that won't breakdown. A crane around here is in the $100 per hour or slightly more range. If you have any excavating buddy's ask them if any of thier mini trackhoes can do the work. Either way your looking at a $300-$500 bill I would guess.
     
  3. CheapScapesNC

    CheapScapesNC LawnSite Member
    Posts: 36

    I built a pond off a boulder about 5 times that size. Got a piece of flashing, put the liner edge in the flashing, drilled some holes in the rock, and anchored it in and put pond foam between the liner and rock. No leaks, held just fine - even with a fairly large waterfall.
     
  4. Mr. Vern

    Mr. Vern LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 632

    I would use geotextile under the liner, and liner scraps under the rock 2-3 layers thick. I don't like to put geo fab in the stream as I am not sure how long it will last fully submerged and I have found that multiple layers of 45mil is extremely difficult to puncture and scraps are readily available for rock pads.
    That rock looks to be basalt, if so I doubt any normal skidsteer or backhoe will be able to lift it. In my area a crane is $200/hr 2 hour min. Very cool rock though.
     
  5. STL Ponds and Waterfalls

    STL Ponds and Waterfalls LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,177

    Geo fabric will last as long as most will have a pond in my opinion. I've had Geo in streams for 6 years now with no worries to date. I also use scrap liner as well, even crapet, what ever will hold together for the most part.
     
  6. wurkn with amish

    wurkn with amish LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 662

    Keith
    just wondering what crapet is :)
     
  7. STL Ponds and Waterfalls

    STL Ponds and Waterfalls LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,177

    You know when your having one of those day's you just say "oh crapet I'm done".
     
  8. wurkn with amish

    wurkn with amish LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 662

    where's the like button???!
     
  9. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    lol well crapet... shifting the boulder may be over my head. i dunno, but i would have no idea how many, or where to put the anchors, etc.

    With how the landscaping is coming together (the entire front lawn is being terraced) I am considering cementing a wall at the base of the boulder. The ground level right in front of the boulder is going to be 2 feet or so lower than at the boulder. If I install a wall right where the base of the boulder is, do you think I could attach a liner to that somehow? The cement would then be hidden with rocks that are part of the waterfall. I have some ideas just wanna get the pro's input.

    Thanks for all the input so far!!
     
  10. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    Liner can be easily attached to concrete using terminal bars and lap cement, but I don't know how you can easily waterproof around the boulder's surface.

    The boulder can be lifted using lifting straps.

    Will the wall be sturdy enough to support the weight of the boulder without danger of collapsing? Seems that it would need be heavily re-enforced.
     

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