Liquid Fertilizer or Granuel?

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by Holistic Landscapes, Aug 3, 2005.

  1. Holistic Landscapes

    Holistic Landscapes LawnSite Member
    Posts: 59

    What gives those results without all the burn? I'm so careful with the spreader yet I still burned some of my most prized lawns. I lowered the setting and everything... Used sulfur coated slow release... I"m losing my confidence. Should I just switch to liquid ferts? Do they burn more? Any info would be very appreciated I"m doing some apps tommorrow but now I"m thinking mabye not.... :help:
  2. What spreader are you using?

    Do you have calibration tools, like Lesco dip sticks to verify calibration?
  3. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    It is generally not the Nitrogen source that is responsible for burning the turf. My guess would be the potash source. Stay away from MOP (Muriate of potash). It has too high of a salt index to be used on lawns, especially in the heat. SOP (sulfate of potash) is preferred potash source.
  4. Holistic Landscapes

    Holistic Landscapes LawnSite Member
    Posts: 59

    I used a granuel with no potash.. 18-0-18... Isn't potash the second number? Potassium is the third and first is nitrogen... I"m just very very fustrated... I am cutting cool season grasses,,, rye, blue, fescue, so what is the rule for hot summer with cool season grasses? No fert in the months of late july to august? SHould I just stick to that technique? SHould I fert in the spring but use a slow release on my last application before hot summer? What do you think? Liquid or Granuel? I will invest in a truck mounted sprayer system or a back pack with a small engine to apply liquid fert at the right rate...
  5. DiscoveryLawn

    DiscoveryLawn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 408

    Potash IS Potassium and is the third number.
    Phosphorus is the second number.
  6. kcchiefs58

    kcchiefs58 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 54

    We use a 33-3-6 with 50% slow release and apply it at a pound per 1000 and do not burn. We are talking 95 to 105 degree range in july and mid august. We also use a product that is liquid called n-sure and do not burn our lawns.
  7. olive123

    olive123 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 500

    i have used tons of lesco fertilizers through summers in south florida and have only minorly burned once with a cheap grade of non coated fert. your doing something wrong...liquids will burn real quick if you dont have experience mixing and applying them
  8. Mscotrid

    Mscotrid LawnSite Bronze Member
    from USA
    Posts: 1,456

    Deja Vu! This is very similar to your other thread. Again the lesco fert you are using is 50/50 mop sop, So it is not the problem. Using it at 1/2 lb of N and no way it should burn.
    There are liquid applicators out there that just dissolve urea into thier tanks, there the burn potential is sky high. Or you could use a powder blue liquid app. super slow release, no chance of burn.
    The same can be said for granulars you could torch a lawn with ammonium nitrate or apply a IBDU super slow release.
    Use your 18-0-18, spread it in such a way as to be spreading 2.5 -3 lbs of product per 1,000 that keeps you around 1/2 lb of N per 1,000 (also 1/2 lb of potash)
    Watch your pattern!
  9. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,956


    One Last time NO NO NO

    Here is a link that might, just Might Help you.
  10. TOMMY1115

    TOMMY1115 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 169

    I've been in the lawn care industry for 12+ years now and have never seen nor heard MOP burning turf.
    Yes, it is a high salt content, but in most "Homeowner" lawns that are mowed 3-4", it shouldn't burn.
    Now, if you are applying MOP time after time on a 3/4" cut fairway, then yes, i could see MOP burning.

    I especially wouldn't expect to see burning up in Michigan where your summers are cooler. I use 5-10-31 (100% MOP) 10%FE here in Missouri and havn't had ANY problems with it burning the turf.

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