liquid fertilizer

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by steve grubbs, Sep 7, 2011.

  1. quiet

    quiet LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 720

    Don't dismiss the value of high amounts of K added to bermuda, particularly the hybrids. Yes, bermuda needs lots of N, but K is a key factor in disease supression by having elongated root growth and increased vascular strength of the plant.

    That sure paid dividends this year where we've only received 9" of rain ALL YEAR . . . and half of that rain came in January and October 8. We went from June 22 to October 8 without ANY rain. That's right, zero. Meanwhile, we had 90 days with temps over 100.

    By August most other lawns had long since lapsed into "drought dormancy", but my customers were still green and actively growing despite tight irrigation restrictions. Years of 1-0-1 ratio ferts made all the difference.
     
  2. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,062

    The ability to put down a 1:1 or 1;2 ratio of N:K is an advantage of a custom blend liquid. I also like having control over the source of the K. My soils are contaminated with chlorides as is. I do not need to add more in the form of potassium chloride.

    Drought resistance is a good reason to maintain more than adequate levels of K in the turf. In a place where you cannot have a lawn without irrigation, this matters. It makes a difference between the lawn that needs watering every 4 days or the lawn that must be watered every day or else. I know what happens to lawns that get mostly urea and trace amounts of potassium chloride. It ain't pretty compared to a lawn that never sees urea and gets enough K and micronutrients.
     
  3. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,956

    ..

    In other threads about Liquid Fert I have talked about Potassium Nitrate. It is a 1 to 3 N to K ratio and one of the favorite fert for Bermuda Golf Greens.

    Some one was asking about Potassium costs and Potassium Nitrate is a little less expensive than Sulfate of Potash. IMHO Potassium Nitrate gives a slightly different greening effect. But then I am part Color blind and see colors different than other people. BTW I am also crazy and see many things different than other people.


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  4. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Ark
    Posts: 3,437

    Would you care to give us a general idea of your fert program? Which part is liquid and what is granular. How do you use organics? I am open minded to all ideas. Thanks for your input.
     
  5. CHARLES CUE

    CHARLES CUE LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,091

    Been reading this ! a Question is sulfate of potash the same as potassium thiosulfate

    Charles Cue
     
  6. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,956

    Arturf

    Sorry I really don't want to post my fert program where my competitors can see it. I have tried to stay out of Fert and herbicide threads for that reason.
     
  7. quiet

    quiet LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 720

    And your fert program for your very sandy, and very alkaline soils wouldn't necessarily be a good program for his acidic clay soils.

    Never understood why someone would just wanna copy a program from halfway across the country in an entirely different climate with entirely different soil composition. Your local county extension service would be a better place to start, then build from there.
     
  8. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Ark
    Posts: 3,437

    I would not just copy a program but I like to entertain different thoughts and techniques, especially from those who think outside the norm and see details most others don't. I like to listen to all and form what works for me. I am never of the mindset that I know it all. There is always something new to learn. Our soils may differ to some degree though I do have very sandy properties but we do have the same varieties of turf so there would be common ground.

    As far as extension services mine is very limited in knowledge and what they give is very generic. Someone in their position is not going to have the firsthand knowledge of someone who has years of in the field hands on experience.
     
  9. quiet

    quiet LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 720

    Good response. Sorry if I sounded a little too harsh or condescending. I know you've been around here awhile. But maybe Ted Putnam would be a better source of info than Ric.

    Fortunately, our extension services here in TX are some of the best around. They constantly refer to and use research done by Texas A&M. And it is dynamic - ever changing.
     
  10. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Ark
    Posts: 3,437

    Ted has given me good advice over the years which I appreciate. I am entertaining the idea of a monthly liquid fert program for high end customers that desire maximum results. As far as I know Ted uses granular though like me he is playing with liquid.

    Our U of A has a turfgrass research program and they could probably give good input but the local rep has limited knowledge. Not bragging but I could teach him/her a few things. I occasionally go the the U of Ark website and read some info but hard to beat some of the good stuff on lawnsite.
     

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