liquid precautions

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by MTR 1973, Mar 13, 2008.

  1. MTR 1973

    MTR 1973 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 2

    Hello,
    I am considering switching from granular slow release to a liquid fertilizer on bedding plants, mainlue due to a need to free up storage space. Do I need to keep the spray away from the leaves or other tender parts of the plant as I would with a granular application?

    Anay help would be much appreciated!
     
  2. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,117

    I use a 100% liquid program on both turf and ornamentals. For bedding plants, a soluble 20-20-20 with low chlorides such as Peters or Grow-More is a good choice. Apply 2 lb per 100 gallons, using 10 gallons per M of bed. If you mix it more concentrated than this, overhead irrigation must be done immediately after application. I feel there is less risk of burning from a liquid fertilizer on plants that have crowns or enclosed growing points such as lilies or mondo grass. Cannot imagine sidedressing a dense bed of mondo with a granule. I cover 1000 sq ft of bed with a liquid in under 5 minutes. So what if I am doing it again next month. While going over a bed with the liquid, I am also looking for signs of insects, diseases, and weeds.
     
  3. teeca

    teeca LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,202

    that would depend on what type of plants your fert. with the liquid and how. flowers can burn very easy in the heat, as a rule here, we don't even water pern'les when the temp hit the 80's and the sun is beating down on them. you can do a soil drench/root fert. application and it's alot safer, but the results are slower.
     
  4. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,117

    I have never seen plants or flowers react adversely to water or a correctly diluted solution grade fertilizer. It can be almost 90 or above every day of the year. That 81-85 that you see on the CNN weather report for Honolulu is from a sensor high above ground level. Actual temp when the sun is out is more like 90. When I do apply a liquid fertilizer to flowers or anything for that matter, it is always watered in with a short cycle of the irrigation system, if not that I will be running a hose. In fact, any application that must be watered such as Ronstar or Merit, I will water in. As the certified applicator, I take that responsibility. A few extra minutes is much less costly than replacing someone's flower bed or lawn. Not to mention, I am trying to bust the myth perpetuated by the local "landscapers" that liquids are bad.
     
  5. teeca

    teeca LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,202

    ok, just trying to share my expereance with you on watering in the heat of the day.. good luck with your plan.
     
  6. MTR 1973

    MTR 1973 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 2

    Thanks for all the suggestions! I'm going to try liquid on the beds this season. It seems like a sensible solution. Thanks again!
     
  7. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,117

    One more thing. If I am applying to such a large area that the liquid fertilizer cannot be watered in immediately, I use a Dosatron on a cart that dilutes the Peters or whatever to no more than 2 lb per 100 gallons. This is also nice for public areas because you are holding a watering nozzle instead of a spray gun.
     
  8. PHS

    PHS LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 724

    As they say, "perception is reality" :)
     
  9. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,117

    How true. I have even applied my liquid mix to lawns in public areas with the Dosatron and the people passing by think it is water or they know it is only fertilizer. I do not get the same reaction if I am doing a liquid fertilizer through my power sprayer.
     

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