Literature or books???

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by joshco84, Feb 16, 2008.

  1. joshco84

    joshco84 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 411

    I am a lawn guy that is inevitably going to have to get in the fert business. I have a potential client with a high end residential that is wanting me to do total care of. From the lawn to lots of shrubs and landscaping. His current guys is losing about 5 shrubs a year, and he doesnt think he is fertilizing and caring for them correctly. So my question is, is there a good book for learning about fertilizing and turf care as far as the chemical aspect is concerned? Im not worried about the trimming aspect, but the fertilizing is really worrying me, and i dont think it should be. I just want to get it done right guys, thanks for the input in advance.

    If it makes a difference i live in south central (wichita area) kansas.
     
  2. joshco84

    joshco84 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 411

    To the top, i would really appreciate some help guys, thanks a lot.
     
  3. garydale

    garydale LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 813

    Contact your Dept. of Ag.,their literature will direct you to publications etc.
     
  4. Whitey4

    Whitey4 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,448

    Is there an agricultural university nearby? If so, they should have a solid library. take a look at what they have, and order the ones you might want to keep. The local coop as mentioned should have some useful stuff. But, be careful... it may not just be fert problems. Junipers for instance don't like wet feet. Sounds like this customer likely has an irrigation system? He needs a seperate zone for his ornamentals. Keep an open mind when troubleshooting unhealthy or dying plants. Often the solution can be very simple.

    I'd suggest buying a X's 10 magnifier if you want to get serious about diagnosing shrub problems, and a soil test is a must. Often it's a simple as having a soil pH that is too low or too high for a particular plant. I'd look at that sort of thing first if the customer is losing that many plants. You could look like a hero with a simple fix like irrigation.

    When I run into something I can't figure out, I take a sample to the Cornell co-op. get to know those folks... they can be very helpful.
     
  5. joshco84

    joshco84 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 411

    Thanks for the info guys.
     
  6. PSUTURFGEEK

    PSUTURFGEEK LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 579

    A great book on weed identity available almost any bookstore is "weeds of the Northeast" I have found this is a good one to have with you in the field,sometimes you can even use it to show the customer what's going on with thier lawn, I think it's like 20.00 or something.
     
  7. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,345

    Drop by your local fert dealer or Lesco/JDL office their guys will be happy to set you up with a program. If they say anything about 12 applications--shop around.
     
  8. rcreech

    rcreech Sponsor
    Male, from OHIO
    Posts: 6,072

    Now that is funny! :laugh:
     
  9. joshco84

    joshco84 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 411

    Yeah i read the thread about twelve apps and thought it was a little rediculous. I have been reading a bunch of literature i found on the county extension office website that has helped a lot. I am going to suggest a soil test for the guy so we can figure out if the yard needs nutrients, and am figuring on putting down 1pd/1000sqft apps at september november and may, with a possible fourth app in early july if yard looks like it needs a little pick me up. This is what the extension literature says to do for this particular type of yard.
     
  10. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,345

    What type of grass? Is it irrigated? What problems has he had in the past? Crabgrass? (Does he need double crabgrass control?) Weeds? Grubs? Makes a big difference in what your program should include.

    Shrubs are a much more complex problem. Lots of different types and lots of different problems, insects and diseases. Winter kill? Too dry? Too wet? Unsuitable for Kansas?
     

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