little hydroseed job

Discussion in 'Florida Lawn Care Forum' started by fl-landscapes, Aug 17, 2011.

  1. fl-landscapes

    fl-landscapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,542

    Hey guys I thought I would share a pic or two of a 20,000 sq ft hydroseed job I did today seeing as not to many people do it. The skies opened up like crazy just as we were finishing up and I had to hand rake and re-seed some areas:cry: But all in all it will probably come out nice. Ill get an after pic when the customer sends it as the job was a ways away from my area.

    lake1.jpg

    lake2.jpg
     
  2. billslawn89

    billslawn89 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,364

    nice! i was gonna ask you how the hydro seeding holds up to our torrential rains this time of year. what type seed? looks good!
     
  3. fl-landscapes

    fl-landscapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,542

    We use tackifiers in our mixes to help with wash out. On flat areas there is usually not a problem. Slopes can be a problem with heavy rain. Usually once the hydroseed mix sets up after a day it forms a great erosion control blanket. Problem was today the mix had no time to set up and I guess we got dumped on with about 3 inches in less than an hour. It was crazy. But 80 to 90 percent stayed put. What washed out I hand seeded and had the customer hold a portion of the payment in good faith that if some washed out areas doesn't come in I will go back and slit seed if there are no issues he will mail the check.
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  4. fl-landscapes

    fl-landscapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,542

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    Oh sorry. It was common variety bermuda. Same as all our footbal and baseball fields as well as every golf fairway in the state. Not hybrid Bermuda like greens and tees.
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  5. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,956

    Fl

    FYI, Most upscale Golf Fairways and Professional Playing fields are 419 Bermuda which is a Hybrid that doesn't propagate by seed.
     
  6. fl-landscapes

    fl-landscapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,542

    They may have started that way but I assure you most fairways have had common invade it and take over. The rays buy their Bermuda from our lesco for their fields in town

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  7. BShaffer

    BShaffer LawnSite Member
    Posts: 119

    Bryan,

    Have you done much research on the newer seeded hybrids? IE princess and i think Sahara is another. I know my old college prof who is now at UF has been working on improved seed varieties. It could be a cost factor, but I remember princess was getting some nice reviews early on.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2011
  8. fl-landscapes

    fl-landscapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,542

    Your exactly correct. The improved varieties are very expensive. Most people looking to hydroseed are looking for savings compared to sod and some of the improved varieties are so costly you may as well sod. The common Bermuda is more of a cost effective way of installing a lawn and not using Bahia. Common Bermuda in my opinion is a much better turf grass than bahia for a lot of reasons. It actually can look really good depending on how much you want to put into it's care and can be a basic utility turf if you do just the basics.
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  9. South Florida Lawns

    South Florida Lawns LawnSite Platinum Member
    from usa
    Posts: 4,785

    Wow awesome work, not much hydro seeding in our area, but when I lived in the mid west that's all there was. You will have to take some pictures once everything grows in.

    How long does 419 take to fill in? Is that Tifway 419 by any chance? I always liked that Bermuda the best.

    Also on hydroseeding jobs do you have to come back much and do touch ups on areas that may not have filled in all the way? Or does the seed fill in evenly?
     
  10. fl-landscapes

    fl-landscapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,542

    Think tif 419 is a sterile hybrid so no seed. Seed was a common Bermuda. Customer sent me an email yesterday and said germination is already starting. Usually seven to ten days then hit it with another high nitrogen fert and you will be mowing within three weeks. Yes I will go back and slit seed areas that come in thin. It's usually a flaw in the irrigation system or the time they are watering that causes issues
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