Little League Complex

Discussion in 'Sports Field Management' started by DLAWNS, Nov 6, 2008.

  1. DLAWNS

    DLAWNS LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,778

    Dude, you're my hero. lol Two more questions if you would know off hand, Would you measure to the outfield fence from the backstop or home plate? And would these numbers include the area outside of the foul line?

    Any other input and opinions are welcomed as I'm trying to gain as much knowledge about this stuff as possible.
     
  2. DLAWNS

    DLAWNS LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,778

    Sorry about that, I posted pics in the athletic fields forum. I'm mostly worried about getting the square footage for fertilization prices. Check out the pics and let me know what you think.
     
  3. jmoore16135

    jmoore16135 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 45

    I believe the center field numbers in the link are measurements from the back of home plate. And the square footage numbers should be for the total area inside a fenced off baseball/softball field.
    Glad I could help...
     
  4. DLAWNS

    DLAWNS LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,778

    Cool, thanks again, man.
     
  5. puppypaws

    puppypaws LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,857

    You can use this link and calculate very accurately any property you can see definite points from the aerial photograph. I have used this on my crop fields that I already know the acreage and it comes within a tenth of an acre on fields from 10 to 50 acres.

    This is a wonderful way to calculate acreage quickly and easily by just marking points around the property you wish to know the acreage of. To convert to sq. ft. take the acreage shown by the calculation method, such as 1.4 acre and multiply times 43,560 sq. ft. in an acre. This tells your there is 60,984 sq. ft. in that area.

    http://www.gravoplex.com/Planimeter/GMapPlanimeter.html
     
  6. DLAWNS

    DLAWNS LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,778

    That's awesome, man. Thanks for the awesome tool. I've already been playing with it and have 10 times of a better idea than when I started.
     
  7. puppypaws

    puppypaws LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,857

    An athletic field of any type would be very accurate because you can see the outline to follow very closely. The only thing you have to compensate for is where tree lines or overgrowth hangs out into the area you are attempting to calculate. You can allow for a small difference and still be very close area wise. You can also figure area on bodies of water very accurately.
     
  8. DLAWNS

    DLAWNS LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,778

    Definitely, if you think about you go a little bit conservative by the tree lines and you still have to account for the infield sand. Man, I wish I was biding football fields instead. It would be much easier. lol
     
  9. puppypaws

    puppypaws LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,857

    Run a separate calculation around anything such as infield areas and subtract them out. This is very simple, from the aerial photo run around the entire area to be mowed and then go around anything you want to subtract out and remove it from your calculation.

    You could have a 50 acre tract with 3 lakes of 2 to 10 acres each, run around the entire boundary with your mouse putting more points in curves, because it is calculating from point to point. Then run around your lakes and subtract them out, this is your area left to maintain.

    On a infield for instance run from the home plate area down the grass line to beyond first base where grass intersects grass then put your points around the arc about every 25' until you intersect back at third base. This will automatically calculate the area inside the infield back to the point at home plate where you started.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2008
  10. DLAWNS

    DLAWNS LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,778

    Cool, I appreciate all of your help. I will use all of this advice for my bid. Thank you so much.
     

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