Lo-Blo the Air-Broom

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by BLAZERBRUCE, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. Breezmeister

    Breezmeister LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from South Jersey
    Posts: 1,533

    Cutting the impeller off is a last resort unless you are in a big hurry, but I have had to do it. I have a set of tapered pry bars I use to wedge behind the impeller and soak it with oil and let it set. Go back later and hit the pry bars, wedging them in farther and soak it again in oil, doing this over a few days. But you have to think about what you are wedging up against, if it is the engine, you can crack the engine case. Heating it with a torch is another way for getting it off, but safety is the word here, be careful if you have a torch.....
    If you are not going to take the impeller off, drilling the hole in the crack is a good way of stopping the crack, but I have seen cracks migrate pass the drill hole, just keep an eye on it.
     
    ericg likes this.
  2. BLAZERBRUCE

    BLAZERBRUCE LawnSite Member
    Posts: 27

    The only way I would find myself going the extra mile and risk breaking the impeller is if I had another one laying around. This spring will show how well I am at masking and painting :dizzy: one of these days I will post a picture online of the unit now, and after. The good thing, is I can easily inspect the impeller through the grate.


    ~Bruce
     
  3. BLAZERBRUCE

    BLAZERBRUCE LawnSite Member
    Posts: 27

    I finished installing new handles on the unit, fabricated out of 3/4" Conduit. The task was easy, and modified the original design to give the unit a comfortable balance, now if you tilt the unit (blower housing 3-4 inches from the ground) it pushes through pacasandra with minimal effort. I also relocated the throttle to strengthen the previous weak spot. Im still waiting for a break in the weather to paint and swap out wheel hubs with a spare set I had in the garage. For a now $110 investement after paint, I can't complain. Beats having to use backpacks in large open areas.
     
  4. Breezmeister

    Breezmeister LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from South Jersey
    Posts: 1,533

    Could you post some pics of you progress ?
     
    ericg likes this.
  5. BLAZERBRUCE

    BLAZERBRUCE LawnSite Member
    Posts: 27

    Breezmister,

    Here's a few pics of the progress,. Thanks for all your suggestions.

    Blowersized1.jpg

    Blowersized2.jpg

    blowersized3.jpg

    Blowersized4.jpg
     
  6. BLAZERBRUCE

    BLAZERBRUCE LawnSite Member
    Posts: 27

    I am going to paint the bottom half of the handles, then remount and weld where I bolted them together. This is where a stress crack had formed on the old handles. The previous owners crimped the handles trying to tighten the throttle assembly. I decided it was best to relocate the throttle.


    Depending on motovation and time, thinking of making the air vane adustable for wind direction. Any ideas? My dad has mentioned making it controlled by cable. He is also going to work on the blower to resolve the stress crack, which I think might have something to do with the engine most likly being rebuilt. The compression seems to be "too good" for something this old, used daily on a golf course, and not consume oil... but then again Kohler sure knows how to manufacture a strong engine.
     
  7. BLAZERBRUCE

    BLAZERBRUCE LawnSite Member
    Posts: 27

    Started working on the blower again, I resolved the new throttle cable sleeve sliping at the hand throttle. Replaced the plastic ties I was using with metal hose clamps. After the engine is running, you can defintly feel the increased tension on the throttle from the vacuum. Before, this would cause the cable sleeve to move with the throttle motion.

    ~Bruce
     
  8. patron

    patron LawnSite Member
    Posts: 180

    I can help you should you wish to remove the impeller and have not got it off as of yet.
    I have owned a few of these machines and may still have some parts for it.

    Let me know what you need?
     
  9. BLAZERBRUCE

    BLAZERBRUCE LawnSite Member
    Posts: 27

    Hi Patron,

    I'm trying to figure out how to remove the blower wheel. As seen in the pictures, the housing is a bit rusty and I was hoping to properly paint this unit. The engine is running like a champ, strong compression, no smoke, starts in 2 pulls. My goal is pull the blower wheel, the trouble is that it has a small hair line crack and I'm trying to figure out how to pull it without putting too much stress on it. Any suggestions? I really like the handling of this unit and would like to get it back to a new like condition.

    Thanks,
    Bruce


    Project so far:
    Made new handles.
    Repaired throttle.
    Replacing wheel hubs.
     
  10. BLAZERBRUCE

    BLAZERBRUCE LawnSite Member
    Posts: 27

    Success :weightlifter: ... Screwdriver, Break-Free, and Dead Blow Hammer popped the blower wheel off with ease. No rust, just needed something to lossen it up I guess. Started to dissasemble the rest of the engine for preping. A few coats of paint and sanding produced a smooth finish on the starter and aircleaner, those 2 being the worst surface conditions on the engine. If the weather continues to clear up, should have this done in a few weeks.

    ~Bruce
     

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