Loftness Timberax & Carbide cutter

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by pjw, Dec 13, 2006.

  1. pjw

    pjw LawnSite Member
    Posts: 13

    I am looking into purchasing a loftness Timberax or Carbide Cutter for brush cutting & lot clearing in upstate NY. I am looking for imput on either one. Quality of cut, maintence, over all performance. I`ll be using a RC-100. Any help would be appreiated. :weightlifter:
     
  2. Bogor

    Bogor LawnSite Member
    Posts: 3

    I've used the Timber Ax, the thing's unbelievable. Mulches the heck out of just about anything in its path, even old railroad ties. Hehe. Cut is rough, but its just a rough clearing tool, and maintenance has been minimal so far, although I can imagine it will be a very pricey rebuild when it comes due. There's no other way to do the work this thing does, though.
     
  3. rutwad

    rutwad LawnSite Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 179

    I believe the timberax requires frequent sharpening. But on the upside, it seems to put less strain on the machine than the carbide cutter. On the carbide cutter, run it until they are worn, chipped, or broke. They do not need sharpening, but they aare expensive to replace.

    Good luck with your decision and business.
     
  4. JDSKIDSTEER

    JDSKIDSTEER LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,163

    I only sell Magnum head. Bradco bought them out. They offer an external hydraulic cooler that you can add if over heating your loader becomes a problem which is common.
    http://www.magnummulcher.com/
     
  5. rutwad

    rutwad LawnSite Member
    from Alabama
    Posts: 179


    The external cooler sounds like a nice option.

    But in all honestly do you think there will be a noticeable difference in the different carbide toothed cutters running on the same machine with the same operator. Not necessarily talking about the size of mulch produced, but overall productivity. I assume magnum is the best? How so? What features make it better than FAE, Fecon, or others?

    I feel that any name brand heads will work fine. Just look for good customer service from a nearby dealership.
     
  6. JDSKIDSTEER

    JDSKIDSTEER LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,163

    I agree on good customer service a must, but my experience with mulching heads is that they tend to overheat the hydraulics on all brand machines unless they have had major modifications to the hydraulic oil coolers. So far with the magnum I have seen no problems at this time and I sold it in September. I am crossing my fingers. I had a Fecon that drove me crazy, and neighboring dealers have had issues with Timber Axe. As far as how the heads hold up I have heard no major problems with the heads, just the over heating issue. From a dealer stand point I had to choose the one I felt I could support the best and get the best support from the manufacturer. Just as you want good dealer support I want good factory support. There was a time when I refused to sell any because of the feed back I was hearing form others.
     
  7. jsbiker

    jsbiker LawnSite Member
    Posts: 54

    i have found that a skid steer company is testing mulching heads on the same skid steer using the same operator.
    of the 4 heads being tested FAE is ahead of FECON by just a little. they say the testing will now be done with full set of test gauges on the skid steer and head.
    i was also told that another skid steer is going to run the same tests using a different brand skid steer the testing is NOT being done by the people making the heads
     
  8. pjw

    pjw LawnSite Member
    Posts: 13

    Thanks for the info, I am looking at Fecon & FAE. For my appl. I believe the carbide tip heads & the RC-100 are going to work the best. Now, finding the work to keep it busy...
     

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