log splitter help

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by soupster, Aug 21, 2005.

  1. soupster

    soupster LawnSite Member
    from CT
    Posts: 14

    I am in the process of trying to fix a splitter. Its a older "panther" splitter with a new briggs 5hp motor.It worked for a bit then crapped out.Not going in reverse without a push .It will go forward with both stages but unable to split a log.I just replaced to hydrolic pump yesterday with a 11gpm pump(same as what was on it ). After drilling out rusty allen screws and wasting my day its doing the same thing.My question is what do you think is the problem the piston or the forward /reverse valve?
     
  2. Tvov

    Tvov LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,157

    My first guess is the piston. Can you take it apart and check the seals/rings?
     
  3. soupster

    soupster LawnSite Member
    from CT
    Posts: 14

    If and when I take it apart what am I looking for? Also on another forum someone said the valve may need cleaning and or seals.
     
  4. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,022


    It's hard to tell which is the problem without a pressure test gauge, But there is no point in tearing the valve or cylinder apart without having seal kits in hand. The seal ring on the cylinder piston can look good but still be bad, Same with the valve.
     
  5. fixer67

    fixer67 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,098

    You say you just replaced the pump. What type of hydro fluid are you using? Now days most log splitter pumps are made to use ATF Dexron II or ATF Dexron III. I have seen more than one log splitter messed up because the owner put a thick hydraulic fluid in it. The manufacturers of log splitters started making the pumps to use automatic transmission fluid because you can buy it almost any where and most people already have it for there cars and trucks. Some older splitter did not use ATF and when you change the pump and put a new modern pump on it you have to drain the tank and flush the system and refill with ATF. I even seen a man buy a new log splitter (MTD) from a big box store take straight home and fill it with some hydraulic fluid he used in his John Deere tractor. It was thick as syrup and would not do any thing. He brings it in for us to do a warranty work on it and boy did he get mad with we told him warranty would not cover us flushing the tank and system because he put the wrong fluid in it. He got it working on his own after two days and 10 gallons of kerosene I found out latter.
     
  6. soupster

    soupster LawnSite Member
    from CT
    Posts: 14

  7. Tvov

    Tvov LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,157


    Hmmm... I have to check that out for my splitter. I have a 6.5hp White (I think that is the same as MTD, most splitters today seem to have come from the same factory) that I bought a few years ago, and haven't had to mess with the fluid yet.
     
  8. soupster

    soupster LawnSite Member
    from CT
    Posts: 14

    Well I checked the manual for the new pump and in fact it says use a "automatic transmission fluid for year round use". I thought if you put on a hydraulic pump that you would use hydraulic oil go figure. Any way I called my local shop and he said I should be able to use hydraulic fluid. He said it might be my cylinder.I also called Haldex directly and they also said I could use a good quality hydraulic fluid which I did. I spent almost all of saturday working on it so I am now giving it to my shop to figure it out. Its not even my splitter. I borrowed it and it crapped out on me ...we will see. :dizzy:
     
  9. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,022

    Thats the #1 problem when borrowing anything, When it craps out your stuck with the bill and the owner gets updated at your expence.
     
  10. fixer67

    fixer67 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,098

    You had better use what the manual says to use. If you use oil that is too heavy to pump with the new pump it will run dry and you will be buying yet another new pump when you fry that one from running dry. The first thing the shop is going to do is drain and flush the tank and system. And why not use ATF like it says, ATF is far cheaper than any "hydraulic oil " you can get. And by the way automatic transmission fluid IS hydraulic oil. There are as many hydraulic oils as there are hydraulic systems. Your cars automatic transmission is a hydraulic pump and hydraulic motor coupled thought at thing called a torque converter. And on a side not Ford type A and type F ATF does not work as good as Dextron in log splitter but it will work better than nothing in a have to case.
     

Share This Page