Longevity of 2 cycle and 4 cycle engines

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by joed, Jan 27, 2002.

  1. joed

    joed LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,167

    I am looking into determing my exact costs per hour so I can be more profitable. In calculating equipment costs, I need to divide them over the life span of the engine. However, I am not sure about the average life span of a 4 cycle and 2 cycle motor. Would the following estimates be sound:
    2 cycle: 3 000 hours
    4 cycle: 3 000 hours.
    The 4 cycle would have full-pressure lubrication and overhead valves. Any help would be much appreciated.
  2. Most cases, atleast on here most 2 cycle stuff does not run the hours mowers/4 cycle stuff runs.

    I would use a more likely number like 500 hours / 3 for it's life span for 2 cycle.
  3. vipermanz

    vipermanz LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,773

    i have a working condition 2-cycle that is 16 years old and starts on the firstpull twice a week,thats pretty good,, i would estimate around 2,500 hours on it today :)
  4. BigJim

    BigJim LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 382

    Used every day the 2 cycle will long outlast the 4cycle,my pushmower has a Suzuki 2 cycle on it 4yrs old 3000+ hours only replaced the sparkplug and the starting string,my 2 4cycle engines have less than 1/3rd that time and not much more left judging by the way their running,Why not just divide the cost over 2 years,thats a pretty good run for any engine used commercially,It allows you to replace with new gear every second year and saves expensive repair bills.Anything else is a bonus over the 2 years.Depends a lot on your operating conditions too,some areas/climates kill motors quicker than others.
  5. Richard Martin

    Richard Martin LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 14,700

    I'm with LAWNGODFATHER on this one. Most handheld/backpack 2 stroke equiptment lasts in the 400 to 500 hour range. It really all depends on the enviroment that the tool is used in. The aircleaners on most of these tools leave a lot to be desired and heat can be a quick engine killer. Someone who operates one in hot and dusty conditions won't get near as many hours as someone who uses one in cool and damp conditions.

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