Looking for advice on a lawn that has poor drainage.

Discussion in 'Landscape Maintenance' started by sandman512, Jul 3, 2011.

  1. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Just raise the area as suggestted earlier, and let it drain towards the woods...
     
  2. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    Appropriate section highlighted, given you have eliminated a high water table.

    You essentially have a perched water table and irrigation is a bit like adding water to dry mix concrete .... add just a little too much water it turns into soup. Same thing is happening with your soil. The usual recommendation of standard shallow coring/aerating will not cut it in this case. Changing the grade by adding soil won't work either.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2011
  3. capetrees

    capetrees LawnSite Member
    from ma
    Posts: 217

    Might I also suggest thinning out some of the trees creating shade for the grass? Let some sun in to dry out the soil and allow the grass some much needed sunlight. Or you could overseed with shade mix. My fix it process would be slice seed with shade mix, aerate and fertilze with starter fertilzer. The grass is very thin.
     
  4. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    I don't agree with that idea, in that only the top couple of inches need to be above the 'puddle'...
    This OP is not going to correct the soil either, so there is no other option for him...
     
  5. sandman512

    sandman512 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 23

    What would you suggest?

    When you say this OP is not going to correct the soil, what is needed for correcting the soil? Maybe I will?
     
  6. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    The only real solution is to break up the compacted layer. Any other suggestion here is a pointless waste of money and time.

    A pic of a soil on a site that has the exact same conditions as you have described here.

    As you can see .... the soil looks great above the compacted layer due to coring and compost additions. The soil at the bottom of the core depth remains highly compacted, causing a perched water table to develop which then leads to a soggy, soft, saturated soil above the compacted layer if the irrigation is even slightly too much.

    IMG_4766a.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2011
  7. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    Doesn't work that way Axe.
     
  8. capetrees

    capetrees LawnSite Member
    from ma
    Posts: 217

    I don't know where Kiril got the idea that it was perched water or that his pic is exactly what's happening but I'm sticking with my solution, simple and cheap. It looks to be a shady compacted soil area that needs to be aerated, seeded and fertilized.

    Good luck!!
     
  9. sandman512

    sandman512 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 23

    First and foremost, I appreciate all the replies and advice. I cannot emphasize how SHADY that portion of the lawn is. Also, the water does NOT puddle there are at all. The is a slight pitch towards the rear of the lawn. The real problem appears to be DRAINAGE. The other 2/3 or so of the lawn is looking good.
     
  10. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    The pic I posted was to demonstrate the soil conditions on a site with the exact same muddy, swamp like, saturated soil conditions when too much water is added.

    The explanation of conditions by the OP of how the soil/site reacts when irrigated/rained on.

    Are we clear where I got my "ideas" cape?
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2011

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