low volume = evaporation???

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by americanlawn, Jan 22, 2008.

  1. americanlawn

    americanlawn LawnSite Fanatic
    from midwest
    Posts: 5,860

    This is simular to the post regarding applying with a ride-on. I've always wondered is any effectiveness is lost due to evaporation when a person uses a low volume sprayer such as a Permagreen ride-on. On warm/windy days, I have watched my guys spray with our PG units, and it looks like much of the mist doesn't hit the ground. Is it only the carrier (water) that might evaporate, or could some of the herbicide also evaporate??

    Thanks.:usflag:
     
  2. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,355

    Good question Larry,
    i would like to see the results comparing spraying at different times of the day. 24 different results possible.
     
  3. americanlawn

    americanlawn LawnSite Fanatic
    from midwest
    Posts: 5,860

    Thanks Riggle...........I figured this would be a tough one cuz I've asked this question to ISU as well as several venders. I still have not received an answer. There has to be somebody who has answers. Ric knows his stuff, he might be the only one out there who might know the effects of evaporation.

    This IS a "toughy". I expect alot of viewers, and few responses on this one.:confused:



    OTE=RigglePLC;2110521]Good question Larry,
    i would like to see the results comparing spraying at different times of the day. 24 different results possible.[/QUOTE]
     
  4. philk17088

    philk17088 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 17,386

    Check the msds sheets, they should list evaporation temperature, volitization temps, flash points...
     
  5. Rayholio

    Rayholio LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,461

    The chem can vaporize for sure. That's supposedly the reason Fusilade II will kill everything when sprayed on 85 degree + sunny days

    I'm sure some chems are more sensative to this than others..
     
  6. turf hokie

    turf hokie LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,744

    Funny you bring this up.

    I do think you lose some amount of chemical to volitization and evaporation depending on temps.

    My first year I started out part time while working for someone else...so I was out until dark many nights. It did seem that I would get better control on the lawns that were sprayed at 7:30 at night than the ones that were sprayed in the heat of the day 3:00. I would say the difference could be from around 80% control in the heat to 90% control later in the day.

    This is just one man's observations, no technical data to support it.
     
  7. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,957

    Philk

    You are on the right track, but only half way there. Other factors like the stability for a chemical come into play in volitalization. Most Esters will volatilize quicker than amines etc. But the bottom line is, Drift is not a good thing. To knowing apply Chemicals in unfavorable conditions, is only something a pure Idiot would do.
     
  8. rcreech

    rcreech Sponsor
    Male, from OHIO
    Posts: 6,072

    I agree Ric!

    Don't spray when windy, high hum, hot and this shouldn't be an issue.

    The time from the product leaving the tip to hitting the target is only split seconds. Is that really enough time for a product to volatilize?

    The droplets coming out of a PG for example are actually very large. I would maybe think that their could be more volatization or just as much from a flat fan application. When you look at the micron size a PG will actually have a much larger droplet size.

    Once the product hits that target, I don't think the carrier amound makes any difference or would volatilize any quicker!

    This is a great topic, but not sure there is a sound answer unless studies have been done on this!
     
  9. Grandview

    Grandview LawnSite Gold Member
    from WI
    Posts: 3,251

    If volitization
     
  10. Grandview

    Grandview LawnSite Gold Member
    from WI
    Posts: 3,251

    If evaporation was such a big problem how come airplanes work. They spray at a gallon or less per acre. I get consistent, excellent control with 5 gal/acre or less.
     

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