Lubricants, etc.

Discussion in 'Landscape Lighting' started by Mike M, Jun 22, 2007.

  1. Mike M

    Mike M LawnSite Bronze Member
    from usa
    Posts: 1,941

    I am wondering what you guys think are the best practices for anti-seize lubricants, sealants, etc. What stuff and where at every install.

    I have the Ideal pruduct for aluminum housings, what else should I use and exactly where?

    Advanced disclaimer: this question only pertains to outdoor lighting fixtures and parts, and not humans.

    Thanks,

    Mike M
     
  2. David Gretzmier

    David Gretzmier LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,645

    for o-rings I use vaseline, It's a wonder jelly ! for sockets I use dielectric grease- you can find it at auto parts stores.
     
  3. Chris J

    Chris J LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,806

    Isn't vaseline petroleum based? How long have you been doing this? Do the o-rings rot or deteriorate?
     
  4. Mike M

    Mike M LawnSite Bronze Member
    from usa
    Posts: 1,941

    Oh lord, you have to be kidding me. Just when I thought I was wrapping up the whole best practice installation method research thing, you are telling me there are many arguable ways to seal up/lube up/protect our fixtures? Just tell me what is the best, practice-proven methods. By the way, Chris, did you pull that stuff out of the marsh yet?
     
  5. Chris J

    Chris J LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,806

    Nope, I've been procrastinating and haven't done the test yet. I did do an add on today though that was 1 1/2 years old. When I snipped the connection off just behind the nuts, the wires were just as shiney as they could be. The test site is all the way on the other side of town (50 miles) but I will do it soon, I promise.

    By the way, you are going to find that the longer your in this business, the harder it's going to get. I remember when I first started I thought that I had hit the jack pot! Simple stuff.....job only took a few hours to put in and it was great money. Then, after getting more and more customers and hundreds of fixtures in the ground I realized that things happen and people call you with these problems. Uh oh.. time to do service calls. Then you find out about color temperature, and different types of wire, and cable loss that creates more wattage which means you can't max out the transformer. Then it goes on to finding out that not all fixtures are bullet proof like you thought they were, bulbs burn out for no reason then do it again a week after you replace it. Some lamps are rated at 1000 hours, while others are rated at 10,000. IR lamps, Xenon, Halogen, ....... Oh my God, now they are starting to say that you might need to be licensed by the state or your whole enterprise will one day be shut down! Organizations like the AOLP? Is it worth the cost or no? Should I or shouldn't I? Do I go to light fair, or go door to door and hand out some flyers and talk to some more people. Holy crap! This is getting complicated. Who the heck is this other lighting franchise? That makes 12 in the last two years!
    And so the story goes......I never get frustrated about it all, but someone did once call me a loose cannon. Guess I can't blame them though.
     
  6. Mike M

    Mike M LawnSite Bronze Member
    from usa
    Posts: 1,941

    Chris, thanks, man!

    Everything you just said is why I am so into the details of connections, fixtures, lubricants, etc., right from the start.

    I don't want all those call backs, I want to compete by having a great reputation from day one, and I want to be an expert who is not affraid of regulations. Let my competition be affraid of all those things.

    :weightlifter: :weightlifter: :weightlifter: :weightlifter: :weightlifter:
     
  7. Mike M

    Mike M LawnSite Bronze Member
    from usa
    Posts: 1,941

  8. Chris J

    Chris J LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,806

    :laugh:

    Funny stuff... By the way though, you are still going to get the call backs regardless of how much preparation you do in the beginning. Maybe just not as many as you would without the great prep work you are doing. Things will happen beyond your control; it's just the nature of the business.
     
  9. Mike M

    Mike M LawnSite Bronze Member
    from usa
    Posts: 1,941

    Every crisis is an opportunity. I think the Chinese have a symbol that simulateneouslty means both crisis and opportunity.

    I am really in need of a hobby or a good book.
     
  10. David Gretzmier

    David Gretzmier LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,645

    to answer the above question, I've been using vaseline on o-rings for one job that is 7 years old, no deterioration yet. That's also a job I used grease nuts on- checked it today and no corrosion in the few connections I took a look at, snip, strip, new wire nuts. maybe at 14 years that "lubricant" will fail.

    sadly, I've had to replace 3 of the fixtures ( cars ) 2 nightscaping transformers ( lifetime guarantee, but I went with multi voltage fx and got all the voltage closer to 11.3), 4 sockets, and 2 fixtures have been hit by a car recently. I'm adding a few spots next week as well.
     

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