lumpy lawn ???

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by googleplex, May 5, 2004.

  1. googleplex

    googleplex LawnSite Member
    Posts: 82

    Hey guys,
    I got a phone call from a guy who has a 'lumpy' lawn. he says it's been getting worse for the last few years. Anyone know what's causing it?
    I haven't seen it yet, but I'm thinking it may be from a cut-down tree that's roots are decomposing slowly.
    Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks in advance,
    Patrick
     
  2. greenblood

    greenblood LawnSite Member
    from Pa
    Posts: 11

    Could it be grubs???
     
  3. TheKingNJ

    TheKingNJ LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 781

    maybe the builder of the house burried trees and wood and it is now starting to decompose. How old is the house?
     
  4. EagleLandscape

    EagleLandscape LawnSite Platinum Member
    Male, from Garland, Texas
    Posts: 4,347

    TheKingNJ, thats what I was thinking. I've got a customer that has that, and about everywhere it sinks a few feet. Almost time to do some serious digging.
     
  5. grassrootsinab

    grassrootsinab LawnSite Member
    from up here
    Posts: 215

    Up here we have really big earthworms called Dew worms that cause the lawn to go lumpy. I know there is a chemical application you can use but it poisons the worms and if the birds get them, it poisons them too. I tell my customers to live with it. Aerating in spring and fall seems to help a bit as does topdressing (evens out the low spots). Don't know if this helps.
    This is from one of the local garden centers (goldenacregarden.com)

    Dew Worms create small mounds in your lawn, making it uneven. Some dew worms are beneficial as they prevent the ground from compacting. If you are overrun with them, apply carbolic at the recommended rate (mixing it with water), using a watering can to prevent chemical drift. Water your lawn and surrounding area thoroughly for 1-2 hours in the early evening, then apply the chemical. Remember to read the directions first before you apply the carbolic soap. Remove any dead worms seen, as they are poisonous to birds. Repeat this treatment several times at 2 week intervals and have your neighbors treat their lawns as well to lessen the chance of recurrence. This is only a temporary solution; the best method is to live with them and use gypsum to break down clumps and mounds left by dew worms.
     
  6. fga

    fga LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,449

    What does he mean by lumpy? I took over a few lawns that appeared to be lumpy, in being that there were alot of mixed in bare spots, etc., that made the grass not appear to be full at all, just really choppy. Does he mean the lawn itself or the ground?
     
  7. pcnservices

    pcnservices LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 614

    This is what we expierence in our area too. I wont treat them with a chemical application as they are beneficial to the soil.

    Those lumps should actually be a sign of healthy soil, and healthy soil grow greener lawns, right?

    PC
     
  8. MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC

    MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 841

    maybe its moles
     
  9. snippy

    snippy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 130

    You better hope its not sinkholes otherwise you may dissapear one day as your mowing along :confused:

    sinkhole2.jpg
     
  10. EagleLandscape

    EagleLandscape LawnSite Platinum Member
    Male, from Garland, Texas
    Posts: 4,347

    Or this... A Ford dealership in bakersfield a while back. [​IMG]
     

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