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making a living part 2

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by lawnagent, Jan 8, 2003.

  1. lawnagent

    lawnagent LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 529

    OK, I have been in discussions in this forum before on how much can a person make, how to charge, etc. etc.
    I want to just put it as straight forward as I can, so please, only serious answers. I am married,and have 2 kids. My wife works but does not make great money, just a job. I would like to think that I can 1 day send my 2 children to college. My 7 year old daughter is gonna have to have braces when shes 10. on and on. Will I ever make enough in this business to pay all this and have a life or should I forget it, get another job, and just do this on the side?:confused:
  2. You will be far ahead to just cut grass part time. You will have the steady income from your real job with all the benefits and then when you are netting a thousand or so bucks part time cutting grass you put that to work for yourself in investment of real estate or used cars or some such and you will not only be buying braces and sending kids to college but looking to purchase some vacation property down in the islands some place.
    And all with no stress.

    Good Luck. Just don't over spend on equipment. Stick with the 21" push mowers. I recommend a craftsman as doller for doller they are the best made mower on the market today.
  3. bubble boy

    bubble boy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,020

    he`s back:rolleyes:

    lawnagent of course you can make enough to do all you want. it might require a business with a couple of employees, but with your wifes income to help its possible.

    will take time to build (years). but you have time.

    and forget craftsman.
  4. grassworks

    grassworks LawnSite Member
    Posts: 134

    I have been doing this FT for almost 10 years. I am currently a solo op but have had as much as 2 trucks operating . I can tell you it can be a struggle to plan through winters starting out and this remains difficult for most. the most successful services subsidize the rest of thier year to alot for the 3-4 months of down time. Another word of caution is "credit". It can be very easy to start a revolving "hole" that takes you till july to get out of if you charge your way through the winter. I guess to make a long story short : If your responsible enough to take care of the IRS on a monthly basis and you are disciplined enough to put away for Winter allowance , as well as Retirement and College funds.... You will be better off than most. You can expect (as a solo op ) to bring in around $8 hour (maybe) after you take out all that stuff above , IF you price yourself right !

    PS - You'll never have to miss your childs soccer game or function and the freedom can be Priceless if you value that sort of thing.
  5. I enjoy the AMAZIN wisdom of the lawn chopper.The brillance of owning a crapsman is so profound:dizzy:
  6. grassdaddy

    grassdaddy LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 565

    If your wife can get insurance on the family you run with it and never look back!;)
  7. wmsland

    wmsland LawnSite Member
    from NE OHIO
    Posts: 127

    The Landscaping/LawnCare business is just like any other venture, you get out of it what you put into it.
  8. KenH

    KenH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,622

    I have never done anything else than lawn maintenance since 1983. I am married and have 2 small boys. My wife does not work. I have 1 part time employee, who is layed off in the winter. You will not make a living strictly mowing lawns. It is too much work with too much equipment. I have been there and done that. Educate yourself as much as possible. Where I found the money to be is in the extras, ie. fertilizing, trimming, mulching, etc. Do not charge by the hour, charge by the job. Charging by the hour limits you to what you can make. Have an idea in your mind what you are worth and price the job accordingly.
    I have about 60 accounts, all high end residentials.

    It is not going to be easy, heck, it took me 20 years to get where I am today. (Im 32).
  9. jason r.

    jason r. LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 338

    I agree with wmsland.

    If you dedicate yourself to this biz, there shouldn't be any reason why you wouldn't meet your goals. Just start small and build it as you go.

    P. S. I was wondering where the Lawn Choppers' been.
  10. John Allin

    John Allin LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,489

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