Micro & Iron costs

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by ArTurf, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Ark
    Posts: 3,505

    I haven't used a whole lot of liquid fert but am still experimenting with it. With the cooler temps now in my area I am going to try some things. One product I am looking at is Agri-Plex by Roots/Lebanon. The cost per K for a monthly app (2oz) would be around 92 cents. Is this a decent cost for micros/iron mix? I am very limited in what products I can get, working on it but very limited suppliers.
     
  2. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    I can see the use of Iron in the turf, but unless your micros are definately non-existant I wouldn't waste money on that stuff... N & Fe are about all you need for color in the grass world... K for winterizer is always a good idea as it isn't necessarily permanent in the soil either...
     
  3. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Ark
    Posts: 3,505

    Not disagreeing with you but don't you mainly deal with cool season turf? I think warm season grasses may be somewhat of a different animal. Also not just looking for color but good long term health.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2012
  4. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,603

    Even for cool season turf, N and Fe alone is setting up a crash and burn situation.
     
  5. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    Not sure why N and Fe, or even N alone is not all we need to add to the soil for grass... unless there is a specific deficit of something... I don't know of any local "Programs" that do more than N,K,Fe...
    Maybe I missed something... :)
     
  6. WestGaPineStraw

    WestGaPineStraw LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 763

    I've had great results with just 1/4 lb of potassium nitrate and high manganese micro mix. This mix is for warm season turf. Roughly $80 to do an acre.
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  7. Skipster

    Skipster LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,075


    1/4 lb of what over what area? Are you using that 13-0-44 product, or something else? I guess I'm a bit particular when talking about product rates. Is it 0.25# N/A? 1/4 lb/A of 13-0-44 is only 0.03# N/A, which isn't much at all. I guess I like the straight apples-to-apples comparisons, instead of talking about different amounts of different products.

    Is the Mn needed? Do you have deficient soil tests or tissue tests? I also hear a lot of guys talk about micros, but I'm not convinced they need them. If you don't have a micronutrient deficiency, why apply them? If you have availability problems b/c of salts or pH, why not correct the problem -- it would be cheaper.
     
  8. WestGaPineStraw

    WestGaPineStraw LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 763

    KN03, 13-0-45, applied at 1/4 lb per 1000 sq ft. Micros are mixed at according to the product label, each variety differs. Micro mix is what gives you the color. I have red clay acidic soils in my area. Now just the KN03 by itself is not enough nitrogen to fulfill the needs of Bermuda or zyosia but it is a great inexpensive mix for spring green up or late fall. Try it you may like it. Let greendoc chime in, he will fill you in on the rest.
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  9. Skipster

    Skipster LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,075

    I don't want to get off track on this thread too much, so I'll keep it short.

    1) If you're using 0.25# of 13-0-45/M, that comes out to 0.03# N/M and 0.11# K2O/M (0.09# K/M). That's not a lot at all. Are you intending to spoon feed (light and frequent applications)? Applying KNO3 at such a low rate really isn't giving you anything. In GA, you're probably targeting 5 to 6# N/M/yr on bermudagrass and 3.5 to 4 #N/M/yr for tall fescue. K needs are often half of N needs (depending on soils), so you would be applying 2 to 3# K2O/M/yr.

    Thus, your app (for bermudagrass, as an example) is delivering only about 0.6% of your yearly N needs and about 5% of your estimated yearly K2O needs. Looks like a lot of extra money for little or no benefit.

    2) You may be getting a color response from your micro product, but that is usually short-lived and only masks other issues. If you have soils too acidic for proper nutrient uptake, a liming program would help your customer much more than a cosmetic micronutrient applications and would cost less. Liming would address the root of the problem, not try to mask it. Do you have soil or tissue tests showing micronutrient deficiencies?
     
  10. WestGaPineStraw

    WestGaPineStraw LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 763

    This is why I don't post much anymore. Sharing what works for me in certain times of the year. There is no problems with the lawns we treat. Skipster, Get off your high horse and kiss it.
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