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Micro rhizae inocculants

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by upidstay, Apr 21, 2006.

  1. upidstay

    upidstay LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,341

    I am looking to add some beneficial fungi to the soil of some trees that were (of course) planted in miserable soil. I'm inheriting this problem, and want to fix it. I was pondering deep root feeding them (mostly maples, 2"-5" trunks) with some home brew compost tea and adding a micro rhizae (spelling?) supplement to the mix. What is a good brand? I am familiar with Roots products, but wasn't sure if any of you folks new a good brand.
  2. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    You can find Mycorrhizae innocultants in a lot of places. Plant Health Care sales some of the best products available. They also have a discussion forum http://www.planthealthcare.com/discussion/forum.asp?FORUM_ID=2 where you can actually have questions answered by Dr Micheal Kenan Phd and Dr Don Marxx Phd that specializes in mycorrhrizea fungus. You cant get better answers that what they can give you.
  3. tadhussey

    tadhussey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 294

  4. Gerry Miller

    Gerry Miller LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 504

  5. Drew Gemma

    Drew Gemma LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,511

    is their a product that is cost effective for large areas of tur anywhere
  6. tadhussey

    tadhussey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 294

    What are you plans with the compost tea? You mention homemade....can you describe your system, inputs, etc....?

    Also, don't forget that mycorrhizae is only effective if applied directly to the root system. Only mix it in the compost tea if you're going to be applying directly to the root surface.
  7. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    Could one apply it after an aeration?
  8. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    They, (the websites) are saying that mycorrhizae occurs naturally in a rural natural setting, but it is the harsh urban artificial man-made environment that that reduces its population.
    If that is true: What sort of lawn practices do you change in order to not kill your new supply?
  9. Gerry Miller

    Gerry Miller LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 504

    Well, don't use any synthetic chemical fertilizers, and in particular, fungicides or chemical pesticides, herbicides.
  10. Gerry Miller

    Gerry Miller LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 504

    Yes, for established turf, you apply after core aeration. You apply to the soil if you are reseeding or before you lay sod. The spores need to make contact with the roots for the inoculation to be most successful.

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