MicroSpray nozzle usage?

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by jcom, Aug 5, 2005.

  1. jcom

    jcom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    I would like to tap into either a rotor or regular spray zone to use a micro spray to give some shrubs a little water in a distant area from valves.

    Although probably not the best choice but under the circumstances, it should work.

    Opinions?

    Thanks

    John
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,000

    One way to expand a zone to add some drip is to use Rainbird's conversion kit to turn one of their 1800 mist heads into a drip source, about 4 gpm, regulated to 30 psi, with 200 mesh filtration. I'm not sure any microspray is vastly more efficient than the most efficient mist head nozzles.
     
  3. jcom

    jcom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    Well I know that 4 GPM is not going to get it done. Flooding is not an option! What experience to you all have with the Hunter Microsrpray?

    Thanks,

    John
     
  4. bicmudpuppy

    bicmudpuppy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,781

    You asked about sprays or rotors. Is there a rotor zone nearby? A properly nozzled rotor zone will usually be asked to run 45-60 minutes. If the zone would handle 5-10 gpm additional flow, you could run 1/2" drip tubbing with a pressure reducer and screen off of your rotor zone. I would be inclined to recommend the Rainbird LD09012 (.98gpm emitters spaced on 12" centers). I like the 18" centers better, but you may have trouble getting enough water down with the rotor zone as a run time constant. Bring a 3/4 or 1" feed to the bed and tee both ways. 5gpm per direction from the tee will allow you to install about 500' each direction. Again, we are assuming you have the flow to spare for that much drip tube. I figure the .9gph as 1gph for fudge factor. In your case, we want the tube laid on 12" centers. I don't know how big your bed area is, you may not need 500'.

    Also, you could increase the available water and increase your rotor zone run time by reducing the rotor nozzles, depending on their current spacing and nozzles.
     
  5. ECS

    ECS LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,733

    I have used the micros several times on a rotor zone with good results. Not so much for shrubs, but for a piece of lawn being blocked by shrubs, trees or branches.
     
  6. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    I've never used the Hunter pop-up micro sprays, but they look promising for certain conditions where you don't want to run lengths of poly tubing. For your purpose these could do the trick for you, as long as you realize that you're stuck with that 5' radius. Rainbirds xeri-sprays can have up to twice the radius at .5 gpm, but there you go having to stick in a pressure regulator and adapt over. Oh, that 1800 retrofit's operating range is up to 4 gpm, but as low as .5 gpm.

    I'd think that if you have only one or two shrubs, then perhaps these Hunters would suffice - that is, if you have a rotor over in that far area. And, with their very low flow rate you'd probably never see any performance difference in the rotors.
     
  7. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,000

    Just how many shrubs are needing water here? There is a trick way to water a shrub, using the combination of a stream bubbler and a flow-restrictor. Watering rates of as little as 0.1 gpm per bubbler, and no special regulation or filtering needed.
     
  8. jcom

    jcom LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 791

    I have 6 shrubs to put some water on. There is a rotor zone and also a spray head zone nearby. I don't want to rip up the lawn to put in irrigation for these few shrubs. I think I could use a couple of micro sprays and let gravity help a little and it would suffice.

    Ideas??

    Thanks for the great info.

    John
     
  9. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,000

    Don't forget the 5-foot Rainbird mist nozzles, which seem to have the same coverage as those Hunter microsprays, and use less water, too. (and even less than that, if you fit them with the Rainbird flow-restricting screens.
     
  10. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    Six shrubs, eh? In that case I'd probably go the route of Teeing off of a zone with a pressure regulator in line and then just run 1/2" poly with drip emitters, or whatever floats your boat. Just keep the flow rate down. Maybe one gallon per hour on the rotor zone, or two or three gallons per hour rate coming off of the fixed spray zone.
     

Share This Page