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Milky Spore

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by jaclawn, Nov 16, 2000.

  1. jaclawn

    jaclawn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 490

    I was out doing an aeration today for a new customer. He was going to apply milky spore to his lawn to combat a grub problem. He asked for my advice.

    I have never delt first hand with milky spore. I don't know much about it, other than it has a very long lasting effect, 5-7 years.

    The customer had some knowledge on the stuff. Aparantly, you mark off your lawn in a grid, and apply a tiny amount every so many feet. Very tedious and time consuming, not to mention expensive.

    He told me of a new type of milky spore, a spreadable granule. It can be spread in the same way as a conventional fertilizer. Here is the part that got my attention. $39/bag, and a bag will cover 7000 square feet.

    The initial cost may be higher than a conventional insecticide, however, considering the long lasting effect, it would seem to be less costly in the long run.

    Is anyone using this on customers lawns? Are people willing to buy it? Does it really work as long as they say it does?

    I would think that you could charge a bit more for spreading the stuff, especially if it lasts 5-7 years.
  2. GroundKprs

    GroundKprs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,969

    Milky spore is a natural control for grubs. If you have a problem pest, and introduce a predator organism like milky spore, you do get some control. But like most other relationships in nature, if the population of target pest is reduced, the predator population is also reduced. Since grubs are a variable pest, and population can change every year, milky spore has not been a dependable control. It is also very specific, acting only on one species of grub (Jap beetle, I think), so you could still have damage from other grub species.
    There was an online conference last Monday on grub control at http://www.grubfree.com , and the replay is available for next 90 days.
  3. Toddppm

    Toddppm LawnSite Senior Member
    from VA
    Posts: 268

    I applied some at a customers house starting in sept., the thing is with the granules it has to be applied 3 times a year for 2 years to build up a good population in the soil. I am charging her $60 per treatment because i also got the fert. + weed control to do. Only the second time i've used it so i have no idea how it works. If they already have a grub problem i would still treat for them in the meantime.
  4. EDL

    EDL LawnSite Member
    from MA
    Posts: 110

    Grubs are starting to build up a resistance to the milky spore. I personally would find other options in grub control, depending of time of season.
  5. lbmd1

    lbmd1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 462

    Can you find out where this guy is getting this granular form of milky spore for $39? If you find out, please let me know. Thanks!

  6. Toddppm

    Toddppm LawnSite Senior Member
    from VA
    Posts: 268

    I read that grubs are building a resistance before, but aftewr thinking about this and talking to a couple people sounds like BS. Do you know of any info or studies to back that up? Think about it, it's not a chemical pesticide what are they building up against? It's like saying people are building a resistance to the common cold?

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