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Minors - Laws - Osha

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by meets1, Dec 19, 2006.

  1. meets1

    meets1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,775

    IS there a written rule that states a person under x age can/not operate certain equipment - climb a certain height - ext?? Just curious??
  2. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,496

    Yes there is. It is power equipment law. there was a great link posted on here about not only OSHA laws, but it had state statutes on it, as well. Also, if you do a google search, you will come up with information on it, as well.
  3. Eakern & Dog

    Eakern & Dog LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 431

    I'm not positive, but I remember at a Nursery I worked at years ago, if you were not 18 years old, you were not allowed to use the chain saws on the Christmas trees. However,they were allowed to use the bow saws. Also, only our guys 16 and over could use the lawnmower and fork lift.
  4. meets1

    meets1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,775

    I was wondering about that. I try not over extend my welcome with youngen running all that power equipment - they all tell me that they have the experiecne cuz they helped there dad. But I am still wary of the fact of something happening or there being just plain careless.
  5. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    I would say you're best off waiting until someone is 18 before allowing them to operate agricultural equipment, regardless of what the law actually says (unless it states they must be 19 or 21, that is).

    That way, whether they're ready or not, now the law says they're legal adults and you'll likely save yourself from having to answer a slew of stupid questions.
  6. LB1234

    LB1234 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,210

    We had a 16yo working for us this past summer. There are limitations on what he can and can't do. In addition, there are limitations to the amount of hours he/she can work...it gets really crazy when they are in school cause they are limited again.

    I also had to fill out paperwork for him and his parents to sign. This then needed to be presented to some county (i think) official who then signs this document (some sort of working papers for minors).

    I checked with my workmens comp provider to insure he would be convered for running a line trimmer and back pack blowers. They said no problem but wanted me to fax them the copy of the document above.

    also, he is a very close friend of the family...we consider him family. I wouldn't take on that risk for just any 16yo.
  7. KS_Grasscutter

    KS_Grasscutter LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,332

    Umm... WHAT exactly do you base that off of? Do you have ANY ag experience at all to base that on? And are you talking about chain saw type equipment, or tractors and combines? Most, if not all farm kids ride in machinery for many, many, many hours as kids, and that is where a lot of training comes from. I was about 12 I think when I started running tractors and combines by my self, LEGALLY TOO. I have never f***ed up anything real bad, either. Now that I think about it, the number of farm accidents I have had any involvement in, is exactly one, and that was watching a pickup burn up when I was 9 (from a quarter mile away, no less). I think before you go off making random, irrelevant, bullshit statements like that, you need to back it up with something.
  8. Let-it-mow!

    Let-it-mow! LawnSite Member
    Posts: 91

    I'm with KS...just not as angry about it. My first time "soloing" on a tractor was when I was 6. My dad and uncle were right next to me and I was driving 2 or 3 mph while they loaded irrigation pipe on the trailer I was pulling.

    by 12 I was running whatever needed running on the farm by my self, including hooking up equipment, and servicing it.


    That's one of the reasons farming has THE HIGHEST occupational death rates of any occupation. 35 deaths annually for every 100,000 workers.
  9. cush

    cush LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    Actually I think truck driving is the most dangerous.

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