More Rainbird DV issues

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by DanaMac, May 17, 2014.

  1. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,027

    Thanks for the catalog views. No doubt the older RB brass nozzles were the 18 tpi coarse-thread types, given the A-7 adapter shown. I suppose 18 tpi wasn't a good choice for plastic nozzles, so that would never had been considered a starting point for plastic popup nozzles when the 1800 series was conceived. I guess the 28/27 tpi difference was as likely coincidence as anything else. I don't imagine anyone at the time thinking in terms of an 1800 brass nozzle not fitting on industry-standard all-brass popup bodies.
     
  2. 5.0

    5.0 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 120

    Nice pics Ron! We need some testing pics!

    Just curious if you know why the jartop DV was discontinued? (I'm no fan of JTVs, but we do come across them from time to time.)
     
  3. Ron Wolfarth

    Ron Wolfarth Sponsor
    Posts: 592

    I am not sure what sort of 'testing pics' you want. All the shots of product after testing I can think of are pretty mundane. I am not going to share shots of products actually being tested because it tends to reveal to our competition how we test our products. We don't want to take away from them the joy of discovery! ;)

    We dropped the JTV valve due to sales not meeting expectations. Dropping products allows us to reduce overhead cost that is disproportionately high on products like JTV. We also continuously invest in all products we sell to improve quality. Dropping low sales products allows us to shift the investment of time and money to the more popular products.
     
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,027

    One dropped RB product I was disappointed to see disappear was the R-50 ball drive rotor. On clean city water, the ball drive mechanism was about as reliable as I've seen.
     
  5. SoCalLandscapeMgmt

    SoCalLandscapeMgmt LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,860

    I hope RB at least recouped the hundreds of thousands of dollars invested in R&D on the product before they dropped it!
     
  6. Ron Wolfarth

    Ron Wolfarth Sponsor
    Posts: 592

    That was Rain Bird's first closed case rotor. When I joined Rain Bird in 1985 it was in final testing and released soon after. It was a painful first few years, but we invested heavily in it and it came to be a very reliable rotor. Unfortunately, its cost of manufacturing caused it to not compete well in the market.
     
  7. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,027

    My only disappointment with the R-50 installs is that wiper seal replacement doesn't seem to have been planned for.

    Actually, another disappointment was that I never found a customer for an idea to fit out an appropriate small lawn adjacent to a pond source, and running the whole shebang as a single zone using R-50 heads with their Rain Curtain nozzles, with the stators on the heads set to allow good operation at 20-25 psi, so that an ordinary centrifugal pump could be the source, operating in its 'sweet spot' of 30-40 gpm at 30 psi from a 3/4 or 1 HP motor. :)
     
  8. Ron Wolfarth

    Ron Wolfarth Sponsor
    Posts: 592

    I was wrong. The R-50 was not Rain Bird's first closed case rotor. And neither was this beauty, the 34 P/F. This was a part circle (P) and full circle (F) turf rotor from the early 1970's. Look at that HIGH pop riser!

    20140731_141757.jpg

    20140731_141727.jpg

    20140731_141749.jpg
     
  9. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,027

    Cool! It looks something like the "spin drive" heads I used to see by various brass mfrs, all of those being fixed-arc heads, with a baffle that forced water into the coverage area, especially since none of them popped up very high.
     
  10. Ron Wolfarth

    Ron Wolfarth Sponsor
    Posts: 592

    I am told it was a ball drive head. Maybe that is what you meant by 'spin drive.' I agree it looks like a fixed arc head. This one has a nozzle. I should have made sure it was in the picture.
     

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