Most beneficial organic applications

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by lep, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. lep

    lep LawnSite Member
    from Texas
    Posts: 52

    Would it be possible to list the top 10 most beneficial organic lawn care applications independent of "liberal use", "must be done by a professional", "what are the soil test results", "how often is the lawn watered", "what's the history of lawn care" etc., what would they be in the order of decreasing benefit? [Assume (i) a single application, (ii) the turfgrass is St. Augustine, and (iii) the goal is to target vital nutrients and possibly fungicidal or insect-controlling characteristics. Also assume there are no parameters upon which to select the "correct" application or how much. Also, no masters theses or dissertations allowed, just enumerated lists.]
     
  2. dishboy

    dishboy LawnSite Platinum Member
    from zone 6
    Posts: 4,165

    Your kidding right, is it April 1 already?
     
  3. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    1) Compost
    2) Compost
    3) Compost
    4) Compost
    5) Compost
    6) Compost
    7) Compost
    8) Compost
    9) Compost
    10) Compost
     
  4. dishboy

    dishboy LawnSite Platinum Member
    from zone 6
    Posts: 4,165

    But what kinda compost, their are so many and it is unlikely that any two would be the same.:)
     
  5. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    1) "Locally produced" compost
     
  6. dKoester

    dKoester LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,253

    And this is correct and I can't help but laugh!!!!!!!!!! Way too funny!
     
  7. OrganicsMaine

    OrganicsMaine LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 553

    The whole thread for me.....:laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing:
     
  8. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    I agree with the compost comment

    setting irrigation correctly would come in a quick second, I hear this from many that THE most important change made on a site was adjusting the irrigation to come on as infrequently as possible and when it does to water deeply

    where you are in Texas is the soil clay or sandy?

    trying to get the soil organic matter to 5% to 7% is the goal, it will eliminate many issues and promote drought resistance, less disease, much less nutrient inputs and a nice stand of turf

    Please do a little background into composting so that you can decide quickly whether the composter has done their job correctly. It should smell earthy, if it has a rotten egg or ammonia smell do not use it, you should not be able to tell what the parent material was, besides a few sticks that di not break down it should be dark brown to black, crumbly and not have an odor

    if it is not composted properly there is a good chance that there are a lot of weed seed in it or even worse pathogens from improper composting
     

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