Mowing Height

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by SystemXpert, Nov 15, 2002.

  1. SystemXpert

    SystemXpert LawnSite Member
    Posts: 66

    Ok,

    I know there has been alot talk about how high to mow certain kinds of grass. My question is how do you measure ? Do you measure the length of the grass blades ? Do you measure the distance from the ground to height of you mower deck ? Do you measure from the ground to the height of the actual blade ?

    I keep reading about the benefits of mowing high with fescue lawns. However, I'm not sure how you get to the 3 inch mowing height .

    Thanks
    SystemXpert
     
  2. rkbrown

    rkbrown LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 533

    I measure with the mower on concrete and measure from the concrete to the blade with the blade pointing toward the front of the mower (the lowest point in the arc).
     
  3. 1grnlwn

    1grnlwn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,261

    rk's right I took it a step further and made some gage blocks out of some oak. I cut them in lengths every 1/4" from 2 3/4" to 4" drilled a hole in them and strung them together. That way you can check the height quickly at any time.

    Mark
     
  4. LakeSide Lawn and Landscape

    LakeSide Lawn and Landscape LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 337

    I just go by the height adjuster on my mower???Is that the right way???:confused:
     
  5. 1grnlwn

    1grnlwn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,261

    Sure if its calibrated properly. Some mowers don't have heights labeled.
     
  6. GroundKprs

    GroundKprs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,969

    Measuring on concrete is a good rough guage. To know what height you're cutting for sure, you have to lay down in the grass with a measuring tape held vertical. Move tape around to at least half a dozen spots (very few lawns are exactly level) measuring the hieght of freshly cut turf, and the average of these is your true mowing height. I have seen the concrete measurement to be over ½" off from actual measurement, and that can make a difference on some grasses at some times.
     
  7. Harvestman

    Harvestman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 233

    I also go by the height adjuster on the mower.On the walk behinds I've just learned how many spacers to use by experience.
     
  8. 1grnlwn

    1grnlwn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,261

    Sorry Jim I would have to disagree (imagine that from me) Concrete is going to give you the exact cut height average. Since the yard dimensions will have a large variation (sigma) , due to dirt clods, holes and dead bugs. Plus it keeps you from looking like a dork out in somebodys yard with a measuring tape. Not to mention the paralax error of trying to eyeball a blade of grass nexy to a tape measure with a wet but at 6:eek:o AM.

    Mark
     
  9. CMerLand

    CMerLand LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 393

    Im a measure from the concrete guy myself, but I did see at lesco that they actually have a blade height measuring tool. Its a brass looking allowy that has a arm on one end and a guage at the other. Push down on the gauge end until its at the bottom of your blade and it gives you the exact blade height.

    Was pretty cool actually.
     
  10. GroundKprs

    GroundKprs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,969

    Mark, dead bugs...LOL, LOL. Dead snakes and coons make a bigger difference, LOL.

    Figured my method out years ago, because I had a couple of lawns that always looked off color after cutting. I think they were rather heavy thatch, and the weight of the mower would compress the thatch some, thus giving a shorter leaf than I wanted. Some types of grass do produce heavy thatch naturally, and these tend to be a little spongy compared to long term thatch buildup from poor maintenance.

    Also when consulting with a homeowner or other contractor on maintenance, this is a quick way to tell exactly what height they are cutting.

    I do use the measurement on concrete to make sure all mowers are cutting the same height. Can get over a ¼" variance due to tire wear and pressure, and some places and times that ¼" difference can really show.
     

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