Mowing Over Grown Lawns

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by The Green Barber, Jun 21, 2008.

  1. The Green Barber

    The Green Barber LawnSite Member
    Posts: 32

    Hello, I Was Wondering What I Should Bid For Mowing Two Properties Once A Month. The Two Properties Are Within A Minute Of Each Other. Lots Are Maybe 9000sq Ft. But Are Heavily Over Grown. It Is For A Town Contract. Open Bid. Again The Town Only Wants It Mowed Once A Month. The Town Does Not Own The Properties, But The Homes Are Foreclosed Or Up For Sale And Owners Are Not Maintaining The Properties. I Would Charge $30 For A Weekly Contract But I Don't Know What To Charge For Overgrown Lawns And Only Once A Month For The Town.
     
  2. mattfromNY

    mattfromNY LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,581

    My experience with this sort of thing- They are looking for cheap, cheap, cheap. I put in bids all the time- double the cost of a regular mow + a little more (If I wreck one set of blades, it will cost me $50 to replace). I have yet to get one bid for a municipality. Doesn't hurt my feelings any, except that when I see the lawns after they are mowed they usually look like sh1t. I guess they get what they pay for.
    Matt.
     
  3. johnnywill08

    johnnywill08 LawnSite Senior Member
    from MA z6
    Posts: 372

    honestly couldn't even read your post because i had a seizure from the all caps first letter-thing..... weird.
     
  4. Icepuck72

    Icepuck72 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 322


    I was thinking the same thing....that's alot of holding the shift key down for every word.....:nono:
     
  5. CrewKut

    CrewKut LawnSite Member
    Posts: 193

    I am not an expert at these things. If you would charge $30 to cut weekly, then that would be $120 a month. Since they only want it cut once a month, it will take more time and effort than a weekly cut, but probably not as much time as four cuts. So, maybe somewhere between. Maybe $90 per month. That is provided you don't have to haul debris or do excessive trimming.

    I don't know if any of that made sense. I may be way off base. I'm sure someone that knows more than I do will post thier thoughts. :waving:

    Dan
     
  6. EMJ

    EMJ LawnSite Member
    Posts: 200

    Call the town and ask what past bids have been for propertys of the same size. It should all be public record. Once you know what the bids were, you can see if it is worth tring to beat them. Around here a normal yard in the city is around 70 to 80 dollars a month. If it is done by code enforcement it is 125 to 150 per cut. That is done by what ever company has won the bid for the year.
     
  7. RonB

    RonB LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 429


    I HAVE READ THAT IF YOU USE ALL CAPS THE SITE DOES THAT - LETS SEE, JUST USED ALL CAPS.

    huh- guess it's a myth.
     
  8. 93Chevy

    93Chevy LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 37,806

    Not to hijack the thread or anything, but I've been wondering how nervous you guys are about mowing real high grass. What if there's a rebar stake, or a rock, etc. in the mix of high grass? What kind of precations are there to avoid hitting those, save to mowing slow and watching in front of you?
     
  9. mattfromNY

    mattfromNY LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,581

    Walk the property really good, price accordingly. How do you know the crazy neighbor didn't drive a survey stake into your favorite customers' lawn? You dont really, that is why you price overgrown lawns accordingly and explain to the customer why you price it this way. You take a chance either way you go- either take a chance and price it low and hope nothing breaks, or take a chance and price it high and maybe you'll get the bid or not.
     
  10. laxative

    laxative LawnSite Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 147

    There always is. Be surprised when you don't hit anything. And have a lot of blades. Last year the ground vanished beneath my WB and it fell maybe 10 feet into a ditch I thought was a lot farther away. Had to pull it out with the truck. Glad it wasn't a rider. **** happens.

    Go slow and be prepared to shut down or back up. And maybe use a mower you can muscle out of stupid situations.
     

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