Mulch insect problems

Discussion in 'Water Features' started by ponddude, Mar 13, 2010.

  1. ponddude

    ponddude LawnSite Member
    Posts: 38

    I have noticed that everyone seems to use mulch around their water features. I am just getting into landscaping and dont know much about mulch.

    Have you guys had any problems with insects/roaches etc.. living in the mulch?

    I have heard that if you use cedar it helps with that is that true?
     
  2. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    I never use mulch around a pond. There is always a chance that it will be blown in or washed in during a heavy rain. Some mulches are treated with colorants and/or who knows what that could be a source of water contamination. Why take the chance?
     
  3. JJE

    JJE LawnSite Member
    from MPLS,MN
    Posts: 19

    Been thinking the same thing .... bet better than 95% are mulched up within inches of edges.
    Usually see the shredded stuff more than anything. That stuff sticks together pretty well. Had some gully washers past few years. One would think it would be an issue but everyone always says "no prob". Makes me nervous myself
     
  4. ponddude

    ponddude LawnSite Member
    Posts: 38

    Good point.. how do you do your edges.. just grass right up to the boulder/gravel?

    Also I tried doing that once and the homeowner thought it was going to be hard to cut the grass, so thats why I thought I would give the mulch a try and go around it and make it easier to mow around.
     
  5. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    There are several ways to handle the edge treatment of a pond. Gravel, sod, low height ornamental grass, planting beds, etc. If you a mulching only around the pond perimeter for weed control, properly sizing your liner and correctly trimming it, can give you absolute weed control around the perimeter for the liner acts as a most effective weed barrier.
    As to the owner being worried about mowing, how would he mow around a planting bed that is mulched with gravel? Can he say 'String Trimmer'?
     
  6. JJE

    JJE LawnSite Member
    from MPLS,MN
    Posts: 19

    Maybe I wasn't real clear in my comments either.

    When I said mulch what was meant is using mulch within plantings/landscaping right up to almost the edge of ponds.

    It looks a helluva lot better than loads of smaller gravel/rock. If the bedding stock is hostas and such the leaf cover likely sheds all but the heaviest of rains. Downpours though? Makes me nervous
     
  7. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    Let's approach it from this angle. One of the basic principles of pond construction is to build it in a way that minimizes any chemical and organic infiltration. So why apply COMMERCIAL organic mulch, in particular, or any other organic mulch, in general, in close proximity.
     
  8. JJE

    JJE LawnSite Member
    from MPLS,MN
    Posts: 19

    Get what ya saying.
    Then again up here plants need to be growing in something organic like dirt above water and nutrients in sand/rockwhatever below water line.
    So think what they trying to do is hold the soil back with mulch, boulder, and such.

    We try to plant here in anything other than soild and its called an annual:laugh:
     
  9. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    If the perimeter of the pond is bermed, as it should be, there should not be an issue with soil infiltration.
     
  10. JJE

    JJE LawnSite Member
    from MPLS,MN
    Posts: 19



    or it seems mulch doing the same. Berming seems to be the key. Long as its there soil and mulch non-factors I guess
     

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