mulching around a tree

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by pines, Feb 26, 2004.

  1. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    ??? what's the reasoning behind this?
     
  2. NCSULandscaper

    NCSULandscaper Banned
    Posts: 1,557

    I have read that trees with lots of surface roots can sustain slight damage due to post and pre emergent herbicides. Never seen any effects but thats what some labels say.
     
  3. gene gls

    gene gls LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,209

    OK, What do I look for on the tree trunk? Thanks.........
    Gene
     
  4. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    Sorry about not getting back to this sooner, haven't been online in a couple of days...

    The only telltale sign that I know of when it comes to girdling roots, is a trunk with a flat side to it. Not all trees with flat trunks have girdling roots, however. The flat spot develops only after the root starts to grow into the trunk.

    If you see a flat spot, it's worth investigating. What I use is a trowel/AML soil knife once the major part of the excavation is done. If there is a girdler, I cut it as close to the flare as possible, and as far away from the trunk as possible and lift the piece out.

    If you get into a really nasty situation, it may be best to find someone with an air spade, those make MUCH faster work of the excavation!:D


    Dan
     
  5. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    My experience in both lab and field, showed no adverse effects of using R-up around the base of trees. R-up has to get into the vascular system of the plant to work. The only way we were able to prove, is that it is only possible through the leaf tissue or through a wound in the bark directly into the cambium layer. Root absorption was non-existent, mostly due to the fact that the R-up was broken down before the roots have a chance for absorption. If you could point me in the direction of a study that has been done, I'd appreciate it.
     
  6. NCSULandscaper

    NCSULandscaper Banned
    Posts: 1,557

    We did a few studies for that at NC State while i was there. Never found a problem with larger trees with surface roots. However on some labels you do find some warnings about spraying surface roots, but still have not found a problem either. I dont see how roundup can get absorbed through the roots enough to do damage as it would travel with foliar application.
     
  7. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    grassmechanic-
    Hop over to Arboristsite and do search in the Commercial Tree Care and Climbing forum... Search for "Roundup study" or some variation. Wade through the results, and you will probably find a link to a study that was done over in Europe that says R-up is bad for the trees.

    However, I think you will also find in that same thread remarks about how the study was biased, etc, and really has no validity...

    HTH.


    Dan
     
  8. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    Thanks Dan..........
     
  9. treedoc1

    treedoc1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 319

     
  10. treedoc1

    treedoc1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 319

    no root flare on a portion or side of the trunk...the tree trunk flat or indented is a quick way of determining possible girdling roots.
    Norway maples 90% of the time decline from this problem
     

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