Mycorrhizae and weed control

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by Barefoot James, Jul 19, 2008.

  1. Barefoot James

    Barefoot James LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 984

    I understand the benefits of mycorrhizae (types) and their association with different "wanted" plants. I have heard that if your lawn is mycorrhizal then you will not have weeds or minimized weeds. My question is do weeds use mycorrhizae too? What about crab grass? Nut grass? Also how do herbicides affect mycorrhizae. I have many customers who have gone organic, yet do not have the patience to weather out summer crab grass and nut grass. Will herbicides kill the myco, I have been establishing - obviously I will keep on inoculating the turf (with myco - especially after killing weeds), but does anyone have any concrete information to what extent does the myco is damaged by weed controls and do weeds (violets, creeping charlie, clover, crab grass) benefit from myco?
     
  2. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    It would be nice to know. You know what else... what about the direct effect of specific synthetic fertilizers on the mycorr's (or any good microbes for that matter). If anyone finds or has information for these PLEASE point us to it. I find it interesting that whole movements can occur with little to no understanding on the principles/claims that cause need for the movement.

    Sorry I was no help, I am on the same search as you...
     
  3. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    If you are talking about people going organic without knowing all the ends and outs then my thought is that most people don't do it because they are unsure that it actually works. I think the bigger question is why they go traditional. If they stopped to actually understand how turf and plants grow, all the microorganisms involved and the workings, then why would they go traditional when that basically just throws the natural way of growing turf out the window? I think most people go that direction because they know it works and they like the results. I have found that organics work, and have gotten an understanding of how it works. So I go that route. Originally, I wasn't sure but I liked the idea.

    Guess it is all in what you know.

    AND NO, I am not bashing traditional or anything like that, I use traditional chems in some of my programs. They have their place. I just don't use them to grow the turf itself. Please don't take that the wrong way.

    Thanks,
     
  4. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    Deep, PM sent.
     
  5. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

  6. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    bioremediation:
    The use of biological agents, such as bacteria, fungi, or green plants, to remove or neutralize contaminants, as in polluted soil or water. Bacteria and fungi generally work by breaking down contaminants such as petroleum into less harmful substances. Plants can be used to aerate polluted soil and stimulate microbial action. They can also absorb contaminants such as salts and metals into their tissues, which are then harvested and disposed of. The use of green plants to decontaminate polluted soil or water is called phytoremediation.



    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/bioremediation
     
  7. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    green plants, is that ALL green plants or certain types?
     
  8. Barefoot James

    Barefoot James LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 984

    Remember Star Wars and Luke killing the Death Star?? He was told stay on course use the force Luke. If we want answers let's stay on course and be patient for the others to chime in to point us to some useful information.
     
  9. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    good job barefoot, it is so easy to get off that a lot of times the main question is not answered or forgotten about.
     
  10. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,604

    As I understand it, the symbiotic relationship of mycorrhizal fungi with plants holds true with 90-95% of land plant species. So, yes what we call weeds would make use of this relationship.

    I am not aware of any studies regarding herbicidal effects on Mycorrhizea. Therefore, I would be more concerned about applying fungicides and disturbing the soil than I would with applying herbicides in this case.

    Weeds are the weak point in lawn care, biological or chemical. My feelings are, if you have to keep your clients happy and are still able to reduce the amount of synthetic inputs, you're ahead of the game. It's better than having them go back to conventional lawn care.

    But, what the hell do I know?:confused:
     

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