Need help...got a call this morning

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by toddharmon, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. toddharmon

    toddharmon LawnSite Member
    Posts: 73

    Thanks everyone.
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  2. Sean Adams

    Sean Adams LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,597

    There are a few options I think you have:

    1.) Walk away from this opportunity. You are not prepared to do this work just yet. I recognize it is the type of work you want to do, but if you experiment or attempt to learn on a client's lawn with no previous experience, no license, and the inability to identify diseases, turf types, etc. then you are asking for a problem.

    2.) Crash course cramming. Get licensed, get online and study everything you can about this type of work. Get outside and actually test yourself - look at turf types, diseases, etc. and see if you can identify them and recognize how to treat/repair them. Read the lawn care section of this forum - don't ask questions right away, just read and soak in the information. Go to http://www.weedalert.com as well.

    3.) Contact a certified, licensed, insured service provider you feel comfortable with and explain your situation. Develop a relationship with him. Ask him if he will do the work as a subcontractor and make sure you are on site with him - watch him (or his employees), learn from the process.
     
  3. toddharmon

    toddharmon LawnSite Member
    Posts: 73

    Thank you. I appreciate everyone's comments and input.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  4. KeystoneLawn&Landscaping

    KeystoneLawn&Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 774

    I would support Seans third option. I've been doing aps for 7 years, but still use a locally based company for very large properties.
     
  5. Darryl G

    Darryl G LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,033

    In my state even if you subcontract application services you still need to register your business with the state. Be sure to check if there is a similar requirement in your state if you take that route.

    If a company which does not employ a certified commercial supervisor wishes to bid on (solicit) a contract that includes commercial pesticide applications, they may subcontract the pesticide application to a second company which is properly registered. The unregistered company must then comply with all pertinent laws and regulations including, but not limited to, the following:

    registering as a commercial pesticide application business;
    having the subcontractor complete Part VII (subcontracting information) of the registration form and sign Part VIII of the application;
    maintaining the pesticide business records;
    notifying individuals on the registry of pesticide applications; and
    providing pesticide label information prior to contract agreements to all customers.
    The certified supervisor must comply with all pertinent laws and regulations including, but not limited to:

    being present at the time of the pesticide application or provide written instructions to certified operators;
    posting outdoor applications with the name of the subcontracted company;
    maintaining required pesticide application records; and
    submitting the annual pesticide-use summary.

    This is why I just refer applications out.
     

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