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Need help with agitation system

Discussion in 'Seal Coating Forum' started by Sealman5, Mar 11, 2014.

  1. Sealman5

    Sealman5 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    I'm looking to upgrade my belt driven system to a hydraulic or pneumatic system. The reason for this is when the sand settles for more than a week the paddles stop and the belt burns up on the pulleys. I'm going to do a chain drive from the motor to the paddle shaft and was wondering what ft/lbs motor should I be looking for?

    Emulsion is coal tar based tarconite split 70/30 - 60/40 with water and usually 3/4-1 lb of sand per gallon of tarconite
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  2. Sealman5

    Sealman5 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    Oh also forgot to mention it's a 325 gal tank
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  3. viper881

    viper881 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 177

    Just so I understand. Your doing a chain right of the air compressor to the paddle shaft?
    I have a hyd. system that is run of the air compressor motor that operates the chain attach to the paddle shaft. This way I can change the direction of the paddles and my air compressor motor does not get bogged down while trying to pump air to spray and trying to spin the shaft.
     
  4. Sealman5

    Sealman5 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    Not quite. I currently have a separate motor that I use for mixing. If I were to get a hydraulic system I would use this to run the hydraulic pump which will run the hydraulic motor which will be chained to the paddle shaft. If I were to find a pneumatic motor I would delete the mixing motor I have now and run an air hose from my extra compressor fitting to the pneumatic motor which will be chained to the mix shaft. I'm going to be doing all the fab work/welding myself so I can make it work.

    Basically all I need to know is what are the max torque and operating torque of someone's system. I looked all over seal rite and couldn't find any specs on anything. If anyone has a model number off their hydraulic motor that would be even better
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  5. JFGauvreau

    JFGauvreau LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,297

    From what I understand you have a 325 gal tank on a trailer or truck, and you are having problems with the sand settling at the bottom and want to switch to a hydraulic system?

    I'm not sure what kind of system you have but most seal-rite trailers will come with a hydraulic agitation system, you can buy individual parts to make your system yourself if your a good welder.

    The hydraulic motor you buy from them doesn't seem have a hp/torque rating. Try calling them and maybe you will have better luck. The hydraulic motor model: (#230-HHM)
     
  6. Sealman5

    Sealman5 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    Thanks for the reply. I did try emailing sealrites customer service but I haven't gotten a reply yet. And my tank is a "homemade" tank. The guy i bought it from built it himself (pretty badly). After a few modifications I have it set up almost exactly like the sealrite tank for 1/4 of the price. The agitation system is the only piece left. And yes I am trying to build it myself because $1200 from seal rite seems like a rip off when all I need is a $200-300 pneumatic motor
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  7. JFGauvreau

    JFGauvreau LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,297

    The reason it is expansive is because you are getting top quality high end equipment that will last for years. I would never buy a home made tank, it's just not the same as seal-rite. What kind of gauge and thickness the home made tank has? What material was used? How well is it welded? Will it leak? is it rusty? Will a agitation system work for it?

    For a completed hydraulic system from seal rite you are looking at 2000-2500$ before shipping and taxes.
     
  8. Sealman5

    Sealman5 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    the tank used to be a drop-on-site diesel tank for an excavation company so it is of sturdy construction. probably at least 8 gauge. only two parts leaked when i got it. one was one of the mixer shaft bearings but i replaced both of them after i found out it leaked and the other was the diaphragm pump but i was able to pick up a slightly used sandpiper double diaphragm and rebuild kit for $300. it only had a 8 inch hole in the top so i cut the tank and welded a manway on so i could get in and scrape/pressure-wash years of dried emulsion. all of my welds are solid and what he had done seemed good also(only spotty weld was on the top vent but thats a vent anyway so who cares). it already has an agitation system on it so i know it will work im just sick of burning up belts on it. if i can find a picture of it ill post it
     
  9. Sealman5

    Sealman5 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    Found a pic I took after putting a fresh coat of paint on it. I think it looks pretty good for a homemade tank and it does its job very well

    IMG_0214.jpg
     
  10. Gemini sealcoat

    Gemini sealcoat LawnSite Member
    Posts: 18

    I've seen a few people now that just haul around a trailer and tank. What are you guys doing for crack work then? Are you sealing in the cracks or using any form of hot rubber, what? I'm confused now. Just curious how some people operate without a hot rubber melter. Thanks
     

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