Need help with electrical.

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by mkroher, Sep 19, 2007.

  1. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    I bought a used spreader unit. I got the motor running on it's own. Now I want to wire it up so I can use the electric start. It's currently wired according to the picture attached. No dice. The switch, solenoid, are both brand new. The acronyms on the switch are accurate. I assumed "ST" meant "starter"? *shrug* Any experts please lend your expertise. Oh.. yes i know..the artistry is astounding. No autographs please.

    [​IMG]


    Shoot.. I actually have the "ST" terminal grounded with along with the NEG battery. Darn it.
     
  2. Leaf Jockey

    Leaf Jockey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 361

    The ST wire needs to go to the small terminal you have the ignition wire on. I don't see where you say you have the st wire grounded. Also, the way its wired it should crank in the "on" position unless the Ignition terminal on the switch is a ground circuit.

    Scott
     
  3. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    I have the ST wire grounded. I drew the picture wrong. So if the ST wire goes to the small terminal on the solenoid, then where does the IGN wire go to?
     
  4. Leaf Jockey

    Leaf Jockey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 361

    Turn the key on. If the ignition wire has voltage then it goes to an ignition coil. If the Ignition terminal is only grounded with the key on then it goes to the kill wire of the engine. Use an ohm meter to check for the ground. Different engine types require differnt switches.

    Scott
     
  5. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    This the current setup.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    There is no coil. The engine runs by itself with no battery.
     
  7. Leaf Jockey

    Leaf Jockey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 361

    Move that st wire from ground to the small terminal on the solenoid. Unhook the ignition wire. The base of the solenoid may need to be grounded. The engine should now crank. The exception would be if this is a solenoid that was designed for a saftey switch system. If so then the small terminal needs to be grounded for the power to flow across the two big terminals.
    Does the engine have a key or switch? Does it just die when you idle down?

    Scott
     
  8. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    Scott, thanks for your help. :)

    The ST terminal protrudes farther out from the other terminals. To me, that tells me that it's a ground, otherwise it'll arc if it accidentally touches the other terminals on the switch.

    Tt's a key switch. I bought it at an auto parts store. It's attached to a metal plate on the machine, so I assume it's grounded.

    I choke the engine to shut it down. The engine does have a kill wire, I haven't figured out which wire on the switch is the kill wire.

    I just picked this machine up saturday, got the engine running today. The switch that I replaced had an additional terminal on it, just for the kill wire. The reason I replaced the switch...process of elimination to get the electrical system to work on this unit.
     
  9. Leaf Jockey

    Leaf Jockey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 361

    The switch in the picture doesn't provide a switched ground position. It won't kill your engine. You either need to get a different key switch or a toggle on/off for killing the engine and a push button for cranking.
    If I'm following this right, you could put the old switch back in and just add a push button starter button. Connect on side of the push button switch to battery positive and the other to the small terminal of the solenoid...unless its an isolated ground solenoid like I explained before.

    Scott
     
  10. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    Scott, your replies are making sense. I'll get a different key switch.

    The solenoid is the type you would find used for a plow. That's what was on there. That's what I replaced it with.
     

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