Need help with erosion ??'s

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Smith Lawn & Landscaping, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. Smith Lawn & Landscaping

    Smith Lawn & Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    I got a customer of mine who has a sloping backyard not even 5,000sqft. it falls off to a marsh in the backyard. My question is he is wanting some bushes that stop erosion?? i was thinking about something along the lines of junipers maybe dwarfs 3to5gal? he is eventually adding a privacy fence but wants the bushes to be tall? Im designing some flower beds for him as we speak. I was thinking about a retaining wall of some sort as an alternative?

    Also he was thinking about blue berry bushes :hammerhead: whats all involved in care wise for these? any help would be appreciated thanks..
     
  2. kpetzold

    kpetzold LawnSite Member
    Posts: 112


    dont know what kind of grass is on the slope , but i would think st augustine would be a good ideo along with the bushes. karl
     
  3. Smith Lawn & Landscaping

    Smith Lawn & Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    yea it has st.augustine but bermuda is pretty much taking over
     
  4. Smith Lawn & Landscaping

    Smith Lawn & Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    any help or suggestions would be appreciated thanks!!!
     
  5. Smith Lawn & Landscaping

    Smith Lawn & Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    Come on guys i need a little help if anyone has any insite on the above thread please respond. thanks
     
  6. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    I live on steep slopes and my clients live on steep slopes so I have been studying the problems individually for years now. One generalization holds true in that you do not stop water. Slow it down and redirect , but never try stop water. (unless you are building a dam of course - but that is more liability than I would attempt)

    Are the flower beds a part of the problem area? Serpentine raised beds may be an adequate start.

    The problem is: ...with erosion you are best off to try a piece of the puzzle at a time. Trying to mastermind everything that the water will do through the seasons happens after years of seeing all the different scenarios - if ever.

    What is the lawns elevation above the surface of the swamp? Does the elevation start at the house?
     
  7. Smith Lawn & Landscaping

    Smith Lawn & Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    It starts at the house and then begans to slope down. The elevation level from the ground to the swamp is moderately high in some areas and almost damn near level else where. Im not too sure what serpentin raised beds are?? And what about the blueberry bush is that a decent wear resistant and what care is involved in it?? I do see what you mean by not trying to tackle it all at once. Im gona try and get some pics for you to see what im talking about and any suggestions thanks..
     
  8. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    So the slope insn't too bad just in certain areas?

    Raised beds are done a number of different ways. I like to mark out a 42 inch space and dig a foot wide trench, (throwing the topsoil from the trench onto the 42 inch space) on either side and filling in the trench with wood chips. or you can use RR ties or whatever and backfill.

    When you dig the trench across the flow of the water the 'serpentine' design doesn't stop the water rather fills the trench and is diverted left or right. This of course slows it down and puts in into more level terrain when directed by the raised bed.

    Too much water hitting the trench will , float the wood chips , and make a mess. You may decide on the RR ties in this case.

    The curving nature of the serpent makes a more pleasing and natural view of the incline, than the square or even circle design. It also makes water more easily directed. IMHO.

    Blueberries are my specialty :) I am at about 65 plants now. They are fun because they are very difficult in this area and their production amazes everyone. I am not sure why, becuz they are great for me. They adapt very well to lots of mulch cover, which holds water, and make a fine looking bush.
    Don't let them "keep their feet wet", is an old adage for blueberries , which means raised beds are perfect for them. Of course low ph so Spagnum moss is a good soil conditioner at planting time.

    Pictures are good, if you get a chance.
     
  9. Smith Lawn & Landscaping

    Smith Lawn & Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    Thanks Small axe i will definitely try and get pics real soon.
     

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