Need help with Retaining Wall

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by EagleLandscape, Mar 7, 2004.

  1. EagleLandscape

    EagleLandscape LawnSite Platinum Member
    Male, from Garland, Texas
    Posts: 4,347

    Ok, got a guy that wants a 125 linear foot wall. It will stand about 4 ft above ground. The wall will protect from erosion from when thier creek collects water (aka when it rains).

    The people behind them built one with bags of concrete and their's is about 150 ft long and about 10 ft tall.

    Questions:

    1) The neighbors wall looks like the bags are just stacked on one another, will that work? NO binding/ supporting things or whatever?

    2) How do I build a good foundation? I know I will have to excavate to level it all up and backfill some stuff to get it back how they wanted. But the creek is always bone-dry until it rains, and then it fills up. So how do i go about making a solid foundation?

    3) The customer said his neighbors hired a construction company to do theirs and they had to lift in a bobcat with a crane and drop it down in the creek bed.

    Thanks...
     
  2. capital

    capital LawnSite Member
    Posts: 118

    I do creek bed installs and walls within and think you will need to decide before you begin who will be paying the engineer who will design and spec your wall. Also you have to factor in your local DNR since your in a water shed and they might or might not have a say in how they want the wall built. All walls hate water and having lived in Texas can only imagion what the creek looks like when it becomes a gully washer
     
  3. EagleLandscape

    EagleLandscape LawnSite Platinum Member
    Male, from Garland, Texas
    Posts: 4,347

    Looks like its alot more complicate than I originally thought. May I ask what a DNR is? An any inside information on the foundation / stacking? Thanks.
     
  4. capital

    capital LawnSite Member
    Posts: 118

    DNR is department of natural resources each state might call it somthing slightly different. The base and the stacking is going to be determined on the engineering specs associated with the class of block you uses. IE due to running water across its face the type of block you use will be more costly than if you were building your typical wall.
     
  5. EagleLandscape

    EagleLandscape LawnSite Platinum Member
    Male, from Garland, Texas
    Posts: 4,347

    Well I will check with the city and see what they require. But I know the wall behind this customers house had to have a permit, and I will be doing the exact same thing as this other company. So I'm sure it will work out. But can you still answer my question about foundation. Do I need to pour a foundation, excavate and fill in with sand? And of course the wall will not be straight up, front the bottom it will tilt further back about 5-10 degrees. It will only be 4 feet high. So under 8 blocks high.
     
  6. capital

    capital LawnSite Member
    Posts: 118

    We have never done one with a poured foundation. We use limestone with fines. However in Texas you might want to find out if their is bed rock right below grade..................if so that will solve some of your issues. If we put a retaining wall into a creek bed area we usually front the area with large limestone rock to keep the water from washing at the sub base
     
  7. EagleLandscape

    EagleLandscape LawnSite Platinum Member
    Male, from Garland, Texas
    Posts: 4,347

    Ok, thanks. Anyone else got any tips? I was looking at renting a Bobcat Compact Excavator. To level and shape this crap out. I've got little space to work with. Is there a skid steer that has a boom/arm on it right a bucket like a little Bobcat would, or am I gonna have to move up to a tractor sized item?
    I know I'm gonna have to use a few thousand 80lb bags of concrete for this thing.

    Thanks.

    Capital what would you charge for a typical 125ft x 4ft wall with these concrete bags with leveling (it's fairly leveled right now).

    I can price the cleanup of brush and backfilling, but never done a wall like this before. I've done stuff like this at my house, but nothing that would be this big. 4 ft tall doesnt sound hard though, couldnt be too much trouble.
     
  8. D Felix

    D Felix LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,898

    Check out http://www.redi-rock.com. I think those blocks would look much better than "bags of concrete" that have been stacked. If you can get a skidsteer there, I would suggest a Bobcat T300, it should be more than capable of slinging around the Redi-block. They are big blocks, and wiegh a lot. The base blocks wiegh ~2500 lbs each, the middles are ~2200, and the tops are ~1500, that's for the straight blocks, not the planters.

    I haven't used them before, just looked into them.

    You can use a Bobcat excavator to dig the base, or a backhoe attachment on the skidsteer. I would use a flowable fill concrete base for these blocks, I can only imagine the frustration of messing up the base when one of these blocks slides. See the thread titled "Am I nuts" for an explanation on flowable fill...

    HTH.


    Dan
    P.S.- Ever been to Philmont?
     
  9. EagleLandscape

    EagleLandscape LawnSite Platinum Member
    Male, from Garland, Texas
    Posts: 4,347

    Um, the wall isnt visible from the property, and concrete bag look looks just fine. It's what he wants, plus its the least expensive thing. I know I have to rent a crane for that day to get the excavator down in the creek, unless I get drop it down with my truck, and then tow it out. I'll get pics this weekend and show you all what I'm talking about. Thanks.
     
  10. EagleLandscape

    EagleLandscape LawnSite Platinum Member
    Male, from Garland, Texas
    Posts: 4,347

    Dan? I'm not dan, but i've been to philmont twice, and going a 3rd time this summer.
     

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