Need OM and N

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by BostonBull, Apr 22, 2013.

  1. BostonBull

    BostonBull LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 520

    Insert shovel into lawn, push back a bit to reveal earth and grab a tablespoon from about 6" down. Repeat 12-15 times around lawn. Put all in bowl, shake shake shake. Let air dry on a paper towel, mix again, grab required amount put in baggie and send off to lab.

    Color fades fast! :(

    Lawn isn't as luscious as I want, bare spots here and there and they don't bounce back well.

    Yes New England soil is always acidic, par fro the course. I would like to bring that pH up if I could.


    I'm all ears on what "plan" you would suggest!


    I am doing CT 4x this year as I said earlier, other than that I haven't ordered any compost or fert to apply as of yet.
     
  2. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    This is not right. You aren't really interested in what is going on at a 6" depth, but rather over the range from 0-6" or 0-8" on turf. You need to adjust your sampling method.

    Your soil has a limited nutrient holding capacity. Slow release form of N is what you need here.

    If you want a showcase lawn, you need to overseed yearly.

    IMO, there is no need until pH is in the low 5 range. In your case, some Mg additions may be warranted, so liming with dolomite will address that.

    What do you hope to gain from CT application? Obviously you are missing something here given the results are less than stellar. IMO, compost is what you need here, and if you can, get a custom compost/lime mix.

    Given your CEC, you need to make sure what you are putting down has limited mobility in the soil. As I said above, your mobile nutrients should be slow release. Keep in mind that your soil has limited nutrient holding capacity and you may need to apply limiting nutrients more frequently.
     
  3. BostonBull

    BostonBull LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 520

    What form of N specifically would you rec and at what rate?

    Overseeding is easy with such a small area, keeping the kids and dog off of it is the tough part. I will throw some seed down this week.

    Ill throw down some Dolomite lime, yes.

    Hoping to increase soil activity, add micro nutrients, and see what the outcome is. Everyone's mix is different and everyone has different results. I am willing to spend a few $ to see if there is any noticeable gains for this season.
     
  4. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Any organic source of nitrogen. If you go synthetic, a slow release urea, assuming you aren't going to spoon feed.
     
  5. bepperb

    bepperb LawnSite Member
    Posts: 14

    Shouldn't bay state be easy for you to find? I'd assume you were already using it but your iron is lower than I'd expect if you were.
     
  6. BostonBull

    BostonBull LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 520

    Blood or bone meal most likely.


    @bepperb......what is bay state?
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  7. bepperb

    bepperb LawnSite Member
    Posts: 14

    Not sure where you can buy, but it's similar to and I've heard cheaper than Milorganite:

    http://www.mwra.state.ma.us/03sewer/html/baystate.htm

    Assuming it's the same as Milorganite it will give you a nice slow release, has a bunch of Iron to make your grass greener, and won't kill off soil life. My worm population skyrockets everytime I move and start using it (which is good).
     
  8. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    Milorganite is even more expensive this year than a couple years ago... no one is running sales of any kind so far and from what I've read,,, the MWRA stuff is sewer sludge and cleaned of disease and metals etc...
     
  9. BostonBull

    BostonBull LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 520

    couldn't find milorganite.

    Grabbed bonemeal. What is app rate with my results from above?

    Also have some dolomitic lime as suggested going down same time
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  10. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    You tell me. How might one determine an appropriate yearly application rate using soil test values in ppm and a known target level of nutrients?
     

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