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Need Some Suggetions

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by FlyByWireMarine09, Jun 4, 2005.

  1. FlyByWireMarine09

    FlyByWireMarine09 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 11

    Hey guys, third post. I need some advice. I really love running businesses. I also really love creating landscapes and driving equipment. I, like everyone, want to work hard but be well paid. I want to invest money into this type of business but what happends if I don't do well @ all (since there are so many companies out there?) I just don't want to get bored doing this. Atlease not for a few years while I get esablished, ya know?
    I want to have just a commercial target market, doing landscape construction, lawn maint., ect... Any advice as to a)invest the $100,000 or so into this business, b)if it's a good idea to cater to and only to businesses and commecial jobs, and c)whether or not I should find a biz partner.
    I am a dedicated, hard working guy but am would initially do this as a side job in order to pay for college. Any help, please.
  2. mcclureandson

    mcclureandson LawnSite Member
    Posts: 242

    Your profile says you're 18 and been in business for 3 years AND already a commercial pilot? If you are flying for TWA then why decide to "invest $100,000..." in a landscape business? I don't get it. My advice would be to spend your summers working for the most talented, hard-working landscape company in your area of choice learning all the little things that make a real company work...inexperience shows quickly. You have time on your side, so why not use it to gain some real world know-how? I depend my skill and experience to provide for my family and our future. I know alot of guys in this business who would like to get into the more skilled aspects of our industry...stone work, misc hardscaping...if I were you I would apprentice myself to the best I could find and keep my mouth shut and my ears open for 3-4 years.
  3. Coffeecraver

    Coffeecraver LawnSite Senior Member
    from VA.
    Posts: 793

    Find an area you like and Learn how to be the best at it.
    Specialize go to school,and work for a large Landscape company to gain knowledge as was sugested by Mcclure.

  4. AGLA

    AGLA LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,742

    You are seeing parts of the industry as we all do. The more you get involved in it, the more parts you'll see. Some parts that seem like they are a good fit by what you see, have some hidden obstacles that blind side you later. That does not matter that much if you are finding out about them on someone else's dime (when you are working for someone else). You'll also have a chance to see how other people deal with problems, labor, buying, selling, and running their operations (if you pay close attention).

    One thing that is often overlooked by people starting out with their own gig without a lot of diverse experience in the field is that you don't have a lot of people to learn from once you are their potential competition.

    A second thing is that you can not define the limits of what you do very much. The landscape jobs are out there and they come with certain things that need to be done. You can not pick and choose what parts you are going to do simply because the person with the project wants someone to do the whole job. So, you are either going to limit yourself to things that you already know how to do, will try to learn as you go (with no one really to guide you and a customer who expects you to know what you are doing), or you could get a job somewhere where you can learn a lot of the things you may have to do in the future.

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