Need to Clear Woods... How???

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by 4 seasons lawn&land, Jun 17, 2008.

  1. 4 seasons lawn&land

    4 seasons lawn&land LawnSite Gold Member
    from NY
    Posts: 3,599

    I have a customer that wants his old 1800's rock wall exposed. Its behind about 15 feet of woods and the wall is about 300 feet. This is'nt regular woods, maybe its because its young? 15-20 years old? But its too thick to cut with a chain saw. Its way too thick to even walk through. Also way too much for handheld brush cutters. Only smaller trees throughout as big as 6 inches. Mostly bushes, vines, rainforest... stuff like that. So what do I use?:confused:
     
  2. tamadrummer

    tamadrummer LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,102

    That is a job for a bush hog company if you don't have the experience doing it.

    They have attachments made for skid steers that will tear that place up in no time but you need to know what you are doing.

    I certainly do not have a clue how to do that stuff and would not volunteer to lose my shirt in that deal.

    That kind of job can be a budget killer!! Good luck
     
  3. 4 seasons lawn&land

    4 seasons lawn&land LawnSite Gold Member
    from NY
    Posts: 3,599

    huh, so not something i could just rent? Skid steers arent hard to use... I cant imagine any attatchment being all that difficult.
     
  4. Isobel

    Isobel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 548

    Diesel.

    No, not really.
    Turn it over to someone with that sort of experience.
     
  5. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    I find it hard to believe that its to thick to clear with a chainsaw. Many times I have cleared mixes of brush and timber to thick to walk thru with a chainsaw. My suggestion is to start at one end working from the outside in. I assume all the brush has to be removed. I have laid down cables and just let the brush fall on top then looping the cable back over top to bunch the material up. Even hooked the cables to my truck to drag all the brush to a convient spot for burning. The Fecon grinder is probably the attachment for the skidsteer that was mentioned. This is a very expensive piece of equipment and can cost as much or more than the skidsteer itself, and it takes a big skidsteer to run one. It grinds the brush and even trees into chips. Makes more of a mess than it helps in my opinion, but it will grindup that 300X15 strip of brush in no time.
     
  6. DBL

    DBL LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,219

    we do a lot of clearing jobs of that type and this is what we do...have 2 or 3 guys go at it with brush cutters and chain saws and clear everything they can get and clean it out. most of the time the next and almost final step for us is to rototill the whole area atleast 2 times. if the the stuff was really thick or there are larger trees involved we use a skid loader and if needed a stump grinder...
     
  7. NNJLandman

    NNJLandman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,306

    Rent a Excavator with a dozer blade. Turn it over with the backhoe and then dozer it with the blade. Try to get a grapple on the bucket that way you can easily grab larger brush and pile it. 2 days worth of work tops.
     
  8. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Your location says simply "usa".

    If you're in the eastern part of the country, I'd be willing to bet that you're tackling a whole bunch of Asian bush honeysuckle, among other things !

    Read on :
    http://www.fnr.purdue.edu/inwood/current issue/fall2006/Fall 2006 Asian Bush Honeysuckle.htm

    ...and the crying shame of it all is that the seed was brought into the U.S. for the purposes of bird seed, and it was never sterilized !

    ( This was back in the '60s and early '70s....way before today's standards for bird seed imports, which now includes thorough radiation of all seed to ensure sterilization.)
     
  9. BrIONwoshMunky

    BrIONwoshMunky LawnSite Member
    Posts: 31

    Dad cleared about 40 acres of land containing 15-20 yr. old trees using our 66hp 4x4 loader tractor with a 6' Woods Cadet brush hog. Of course, after each day we had to spend about 2 hours beating the bucket back to straight with a sledgehammer, there also wasn't much underbrush. Dad said, if he could drive over it with the tractor, it went under the brushhog. Of course, he was creating brush piles with the larger trees to either let rot down and/or burn during the winter, I'm sure to actually get rid of it all would be quite the undertaking.
     
  10. mowingguy

    mowingguy Guest
    Posts: 0

    If you are the four seasons up the road from me... let me know. I got the equipment... and the time. -SL
     

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