needing advice

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by REDH, Feb 9, 2008.

  1. REDH

    REDH LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    Hey Guy's, great site. I'am just a home owner looking for an answer. This past fall I arreated and overseeded. I did it kinda of late because of the unreal drought we had. Some of the seeds took hold before the real cold weather set in. My question is this: if I put out a pre-emerg for the crabgrass in the next week of two as the bag says to do, am I going to hinder any of the new growth of the tall fesque I planted in the fall? I just don't want to mess up what I have trying so hard to do, which is have a good stand of grass.

    Thanks for any help you can give, this site ROCKS!!!

    Red
     
  2. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    The answer is a definite maybe. The situation you have, is that you have the potential of having alot of viable seed that hasn't germinated yet due to the lateness of the planting. On the other hand, it depends on how much or little grass was already growing (that it was just an overseeding). You may have enough good grass already growing, that just the right nutrients may be more of what you actually need. Pics would certainly help, as it would tell us just what stages and condition this grass is in. If you still have quite a bit of seed that hasn't germinated, I might elect to hold off and go with Dimension at a later date.
     
  3. REDH

    REDH LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    Thanks Runner for the reply. Not sure what you mean by Dimension though.

    Red
     
  4. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    Dimension is product that is a pre-emergent, but also acts as a post-emergent on crabgrass up to the 3rd tiller stage. Therefore, it allows us to apply it later than most other pre-emergents,....giving us a longer window.
     
  5. TScapes

    TScapes LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 453

    Red-

    Yes and no to your question. Chances are that any seed that did not germinate won't due to a multitude of things, your pre-m, temps, etc. I simply would not worry about it now. You basically have one of two choices for a home owner..... 1) Take your chances and overseed again and just delay your applying any Pre-m or 2) Go ahead and apply your pre-m and keep up with your fert and weed control through the year until next fall.

    Also, just food for thought... around our area (Knoxville) the soil temps usually don't get high enough for the crabgrass to germinate until late March or April. A general rule is to look for the Forsythia's to be in full bloom. This is the time to apply the Pre-m. A good date to go by here is St. Patty's Day!

    Good Luck!!
     
  6. tlg

    tlg LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 647

    The best plan would be avoiding any pre -emergent this spring. The seed was applied late in the fall. There was some germination but some areas may not have taken hold. For the most part you will more than likely have to re-seed areas that are bare. This should be done as early as possible in the spring when the soil is workable and soil temps would support germination. Pre-emergents applied would delay any new seeding that you may want to do as most don't allow seeding for 60 to 90 days after application.Your newly established grass plants are also too delicate to handle a pre-emergent and the new turf should be mowed at least four times before any pre-emergent be applied. Concentrate on getting a good stand of grass instead. Apply a good starter fertilizer and keep the new ly established lawn watered. Crabgrass is a possibility but your better off not using the pre-emergent. Also avoid any broadleaf weed controls untill you have the new lawn growing well.
     
  7. REDH

    REDH LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    Thanks for the replies guys. I know from reading this forum( which is awesome by the way) that ya'll recommend aerating in the fall, but do ya'll think it might be worth doing again in the next month and a half or so, or just wait to see what happens when the ground temps start to rise? It has finally been raining around here pretty regular after the having the worst drought in our history.

    Thanks again,
    Red
     
  8. kristink

    kristink LawnSite Member
    Posts: 4

    If I were you I'd wait it out. I agree that you could have seeds that are viable yet have not sprouted yet. Spring is an excellent time with frequent showers happening to really let the seeds that are established take off. I have crab grass in our yard, and I get very frustrated at it. If I was to do a yard all over there is no way I would apply crab grass. It may make you're yard look greener in the beginning, but I don't know if it's worth it in the end!
     
  9. TScapes

    TScapes LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 453

    Red-
    Like some of us have said, You really need to get your lawn on a fert and weed control program and prevent any crabgrass from getting its foothold on your lawn. This will help to ensure that you have a healthy and established lawn for you to build on come fall.

    If you wish to aerate and seed this spring, do it in the first half of March and make sure you apply a "Starter Fert". You can still see this on the shelves of all the retail stores around here. Make sure you keep the water on the new grass if the rain holds off!! Then once the seedlings are tall enough to mow (3-4"), then go ahead and apply your first round of pre-m and weed control! Just keep in mind that here in our neck of the woods (East TN) your best conditions will only get you 40% germination of the seeding in the spring, simply due to fact that the grass generally won't have time to establish itself and develop a good root system before the heat and dry conditions come into the mix. So keep in mind that you still need to water your lawn if you want you decide to seed this spring. Good Luck!!!
     
  10. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    The pre-Ms function by preventing root development 'after' the seeds have germinated. I would wait to see if I get any cool weather grass germination, (even by overseeding this spring again) then put down the pre-m in areas that did not take very well.

    If you get a good stand of grass you do not need pre-m in those areas. In response to your other question it is pretty much safe to areate any time that the ground is not to wet, too dry, too cold or hot. The question is, "why do you want to?" The danger is that anything can germinate in the plugs.

    Yes, this was a bad year almost everywhere. Compost is a good soil cover and helps in germination if you 'firm' it into that. Retaining water and allowing air to move. If you are lucky you may not even need pre-m in the larger areas of lawn.

    Sometimes spring gives you a chance to time these things and sometimes it turns so quickly the only thing that does germinate is the crabgrass. have fun.
     

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